Posts Tagged ‘snowmobiling’

Thursday, June 25, 2009

$250k For Local Snowmobile Clubs, Trails

New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has announced $3.3 million in grant awards for 32 trail-related projects around the state as part of the federal Recreational Trails Program. Over a quarter million dollars is slated to be spent on local snowmobile trails. The grants will be used for such projects as creating new trails, improving trails, providing connections and purchasing equipment. Trail development plans must emphasize providing access for people with disabilities and minimizing environmental impact.

New York has one of the most expansive trail systems in the nation. The trails, which lead through public and private lands, are developed and maintained by state and local municipalities and volunteers.

State Parks administers the federal matching grant program providing funding to state and local governments, not-for-profit organizations, corporations, and partnerships for the maintenance, renovation, development, acquisition and construction of trails and trail-related facilities. Funding is provided through the Federal Highway Administration’s Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU).

Projects recommended for funding in the Adirondack counties include:

Hamilton County

Pleasant Rider Snowmobilers Inc $54,900 – The grant will go toward the purchase of equipment for public snowmobile trail maintenance in Lake Pleasant, Hamilton County.

Herkimer County

Salisbury Ridgerunners Snowmobile Club, Inc. $132,782 – The Salisbury Ridgerunners Snowmobile Club will purchase equipment to groom and improve 79 miles of heavily utilized, multipurpose, year-round trails in the Southern Adirondack-Mohawk Valley region.

Jefferson County

Jefferson County Soil and Water Conservation District $107,760 – The project is to restore approximately six miles of trails, including improving stream crossings and drainage, on two county forest lots as part of a multi-county trails system.

Village of West Carthage $114,908 – The village will expand public and pedestrian access, walkways, and amenities at the South Main Street Boat Launch area, including an asphalt walkway, a picnic shelter, a wood chip wetland trail, a concrete boat launch ramp, an asphalt road and parking area, tree plantings, interpretive panels and signage, and benches.

Lewis County

Lewis County Department of Forestry, Parks and Recreation $110,550 – The project will create a Tug Hill Trail System using county reforestation lands, and private land for motorized and non-motorized recreation.

Barnes Corners Sno-Pals, Inc. $37,064 – The Barnes Corners Sno-Pals, which maintains over 100 miles of snowmobile trails, will purchase an all-season tractor with a front end loader and rotary cutter to perform all-season trail maintenance.

Saratoga County

Town of Halfmoon $200,000 – The Town of Halfmoon will construct a second segment of the Champlain Canal Towpath trail.


Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Discussion: Reopening Historic Adirondack Roads

A week ago today, state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Pete Grannis effectively reopened Old Mountain Road between North Elba (Route 73) and Keene (Shackett Road / Route 40) in Essex County. According to surveys made in 1893-1894 (here, and here), the road had been abandoned since the 19th century; it was believed to have been officially closed when the Sentinel Wilderness Area UMP was ratified in 1974. Beginning in 1986 part of the road has been maintained as the popular 35-mile long Jackrabbit Trail by the Adirondack Ski Touring Council.

The Grannis decision was forced by Lake Placid Snowmobile Club President James McCulley who drove his truck down the trail in May of 2005 and was ticketed (he previously beat a 2003 ticket for doing the same thing with his snowmobile). An agency administrative judge later found that the road had never been closed properly (it required public hearings). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 3, 2009

From Our Archive


Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Homegrown Adirondack Sled Porn

The internet is doing for snowmobiling what Warren Miller films have done for skiing for 50 years. On YouTube you can now watch your Adirondack neighbors performing outlandish, sick and sometimes illegal stunts on sleds. Here are just a few:

There’s channel surfing in Tupper Lake.

And jumping fire in Tupper Lake.

Summer skimming on Lake Flower, Saranac Lake.

Plus the midnight ride of some guy in underwear, Tupper Lake.


Most sledders don’t do such badass stuff, of course. And the people in these videos don’t seem to be endangering anyone but themselves.

But this one is scary: “Coming from the Tap Room in Raquette Lake, NY.” The helmet-cam video would actually be boring if it weren’t for the tension created by those words, “coming from the Tap Room,” and the fact that the driver passes a car and other sleds on a public road while going 67 miles per hour.

As my father often says, these guys are dearly wanted in heaven. Thirteen so far in the state this winter. No more, let’s hope.


Tuesday, January 3, 2006

New Adirondack Snowmobile Trail Conditions Website

From the Adirondacks Speculator Region Chamber of Commerce comes a new website that offers snowmobile trail conditions laid out in tables that identify each route (with trail numbers, segments between intersections, and municipal locations), the date the trail was last groomed, the date conditions were assessed and the conditions (great, good, fair, poor, closed).

The page includes trails in Lake Pleasant, Speculator, Arietta, Piseco, Wells, and Morehouse. The page also links to Trail Etiquette, a Trail Map cover 650 miles of area trails, GPS points, a Webcam and Photo Gallery, and a discussion board covering the area plus Indian Lake, the Moose River Plains, and other areas of the park.

Here at the Almanack, we have always believed that appropriately placed snowmobile trails (kept out of wilderness and wild forest areas) are an important component to the Adirondack economy. Riders should accept and defend the seven wilderness “leave no trace” principles.

Links to area snowmobile clubs – enjoy.