Posts Tagged ‘solar eclipse’

Saturday, April 13, 2024

Birds go quiet, crocuses close during eclipse totality

Eclipse totality

I’m starting this column before the eclipse event this afternoon, April 8, as the skies are partly cloudy here and I hope it is clearer this afternoon. I’m going to try and take a few shots when it is total. My fifteen bird feeders are highly active, so I will see what happens when the darkness comes. I’ll also see how the birds react when the sun comes back out in a few minutes. We’ll see if they take a quick nap like it was nighttime or if they get back to feeding when the sun comes back out like they do at daylight in the morning.

Karen went into town to get the mail and she said it was almost like the Fourth of July. Tom Payne of Payne’s Air Service has been flying almost all day as many of our new visitors have never had a seaplane ride over the Adirondacks. I heard a helicopter flying over earlier this morning going somewhere to the north of us.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 12, 2024

Experiencing the eclipse at ADKX with friends, including an ADK first-timer

Two people wear eclipse glasses and hold up signs

My friends, Rosemary and David, joined me to view the eclipse from the ADKX in Blue Mountain Lake. Thankfully, we had an uneventful ride there. David lives in Williamstown, MA, and this was his first time in the Adirondacks. Rosemary had taken this ride with me before, so we pointed out lakes and landmarks, including Pig Rock. The only short congestion we encountered was at the intersection in Indian Lake. We made it to the museum and staked out a spot. It was a beautiful, sunny day. Museum staff were helpful and friendly, as were the guests around us.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2024

Our guideboat heritage

 

A man works at a museum

Digitizing a boat collection

Adirondack Experience museum in Blue Mountain Lake maintains one of the most expansive and important collections of Adirondack guideboats anywhere.

It is working to digitize that collection through a process of creating 3-D models called photogrammetry. The models will enable anyone to access more details about the boats and enable researchers to examine how the boats evolved over time. How did boats differ from the Long Lake to Saranac Lake region? The 3-D models may reveal hints.

“The guideboat is really a supreme example of lightweight boat construction—of all wooden boat construction, anywhere,” Hallie Bond, who wrote the book on Adirondack boating, told me during a recent tour of the museum.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 9, 2024

Solar eclipse

girl scout wear eclipse glasses

Eclipse

Explorer staff and correspondents were stationed across the region to bring you solar eclipse coverage. Check out our website and social media accounts for updates, photos and more. Read our story here.

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Saturday, April 6, 2024

Urging eclipse travelers to respect the Park, refrain from littering

Jake turkeys strutting

Well, the eclipse is coming Monday, April 8, but don’t put all your eggs in one basket as it may be cloudy or even raining…hate to dampen your parade, but it could happen. Looking at the weather prediction for that day, it looks good on the computer, but you never know. The area that I pick up litter along the highway has been mostly clear of snow for a couple weeks now, but I’m going to wait until after all these eclipse travelers are gone and only hope they take their litter with them.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, April 1, 2024

New York State Mesonet Launches Total Solar Eclipse Website

total solar eclipse

A new website launched by the New York State Mesonet at the University at Albany will offer real-time access to weather data statewide around the total solar eclipse on April 8. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun’s face. In total, 55 NYS Mesonet sites will experience totality during the eclipse, and every site will be above 90 percent at the peak of the eclipse crossing the region. 

As the eclipse traverses New York, the Mesonet will be tracking weather data from each of its network sites, including environmental variables such as wind speed, solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity. 

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 28, 2024

Paddling group urges safety, environmental responsibility during eclipse

 NFCT Board Chair Warren Whitney

By Northern Forest Canoe Trail Board Chair Warren Whitney

The April 8 total solar eclipse is a once-in-a-lifetime event that will be viewed by millions, many of whom will flock to remote wilderness and rural areas, including much of the Northeast — an exciting moment, to be sure, but also one that warrants responsible use of our wild spaces, and some advance planning.

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) spans 740 miles of waterways and trails from Old Forge, NY, to Fort Kent, Maine; the entire trail aligns with the path of the solar eclipse. As the nonprofit responsible for stewardship of this trail, and an organization that promotes paddling to people of all backgrounds, we’re excited about the eclipse. We also strongly urge people to take extra heed of Leave No Trace principles, as unusually high traffic can have a negative impact on the environment.

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Thursday, March 14, 2024

DEC Issues Public Safety Information Ahead of Solar Eclipse

total solar eclipse

Rare Celestial Event on April 8 Expected to Attract Thousands of Visitors to New York State

On March 11, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos provided valuable tips to help the public prepare to recreate safely and responsibly as New Yorkers count down the days to the highly anticipated total solar eclipse, which occurs exactly four weeks from today. While DEC law enforcement and operations staff will be prepared for visitors, eclipse watchers are encouraged to find Adirondack destinations outside the backcountry or opt for visiting one of the many designated viewing locations across the state.

Monday, April 8, 2024, the roughly 100-mile-wide path of totality across Upstate New York will begin near Jamestown, Chautauqua County, at approximately 3:16 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time and exit near Plattsburgh, Clinton County, at approximately 3:29 p.m. Cities and towns within the path of totality also include Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Rochester, Syracuse, Watertown, Old Forge, and Lake Placid.

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Monday, February 5, 2024

Forests, climate and Paul Smith’s

Fall at Paul Smith’s VIC

The Adirondack Park’s only four-year college is looking to expand its funding sources and boost enrollment using several grants. With about $3 million banked and $4 million more pursued, Paul Smith’s College is tracking new opportunities.

Some of their funding was awarded for their climate education.

“You can’t start to separate forestry education from climate education because if you follow the literature, we know that the Adirondacks is a big carbon sink,” Dan Kelting, president of the college, told me yesterday [Jan. 31]. “And so the Adirondacks plays a large role in regulating the carbon that’s in our atmosphere.”

There are also plans to establish a new research institute on campus. Read the story here.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 30, 2024

ADK Groups Urge Backcountry Caution During April 8 Eclipse

total solar eclipse

Community-based celebrations provide safe, exciting viewing experiences 

Saranac Lake, NY – The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST), Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK), and Adirondack Council are urging caution for those considering an Adirondack Park backcountry adventure to view the total solar eclipse this April.

On April 8, much of the Adirondack Park will be in the path of totality for the once-in-a-lifetime, full solar eclipse, and while the mountains and lakes of the Adirondacks may provide a beautiful backdrop, conditions in the Adirondack backcountry that time of year can be perilous.

Given the combined natural beauty of the Adirondacks and the eclipse, people may be considering a hike into the Adirondack wilderness to view it. However, it is likely that full winter conditions will be present on the trails and mountains at that time, with dangers to people and the environment if hikers are not prepared.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 25, 2024

Discussion time: Eclipse plans

total solar eclipse

With a total solar eclipse just over 2 months away, I figure it’s time to take stock. Are you planning to attend a viewing party? Stay home and watch in your backyard? Or travel to see it?

We’ve been working on a guide to “everything you need to know” about this upcoming celestial event on April 8. Check it out and let me know what you think. What else should we add to it? We’re in the process of putting together a list of events around the region. Let us know what’s being planned in your Adirondack community!

Drop your eclipse plans and thoughts in the comments section!

Wikimedia Commons photo.


Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Wild Center in the running for ‘best science museum’

Adirondack Youth Climate Summit

Tickets on sale for total solar eclipse event

For the second year in a row, The Wild Center is honored to be nominated as “Best Science Museum” in USA TODAY’s 2024 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards. Friends and fans of the museum are encouraged to support The Wild Center by voting online, now until Feb. 12. Winners will be announced on Fri., Feb. 23. Readers are allowed one online vote per day.

The Wild Center was also nominated in 2023, where they finished second in a list of the top ten museums, alongside The Museum of Flight in Seattle and the Michigan Science Center in Detroit.

As anticipation mounts for the upcoming total solar eclipse, The Wild Center announces a weekend of celestial celebrations Apr. 6-8. Tickets for the Total Solar Eclipse weekend are available to the public at wildcenter.org/eclipse.

Positioned directly in the path of totality, guests can enjoy “The Wildest View in the World” through a variety of themed activities, including solar-powered maple tastings and tapping demos, a solar-powered silent disco, and glass blowing demonstrations from the Corning Museum of Glass Mobile Hot Shop. Visitors can also make pinhole viewers and permanently commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event with an eclipse tattoo from Plain Jane Tattoos.

Admission is complimentary on Apr. 8, with advanced tickets required for all days. Each ticket includes a pair of eclipse-viewing glasses. Admission fees for Apr. 6-7 are:

Adults aged 18-64: $23, $24 at the door
Senior citizens (65+) and military personnel: $21, $22 at the door
Children aged 5-17, $13, $14 at the door
Children aged 4: Free admissionThe Wild Center’s celebration is part of Totality in Tupper, a community-wide event co-hosted by the Adirondack Sky Center and Observatory.


Monday, June 19, 2023

Adirondack Coast Visitors Bureau launches eclipse website

solar eclipse

The Adirondack Coast Visitors Bureau, a division of the North Country Chamber of Commerce, is proud to announce the launch of its website, adkcoasteclipse.com, dedicated to the awe-inspiring solar eclipse coming in 2024 – less than 300 days away! The launch of adkcoasteclipse.com website represents a significant milestone in positioning the North Country as a premier destination for the 2024 solar eclipse. By offering a comprehensive and engaging digital platform, we aim to attract visitors from across the globe, fostering economic growth and supporting local businesses and communities.

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Friday, April 21, 2023

ROOST plans for 2024 solar eclipse, public meeting set for May 10

 

Solar eclipse 2024 graphic.

Lake Placid, NY – The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has begun its efforts to assist local businesses, communities, residents, and visitors in planning for the solar eclipse, taking place next April. The Adirondack region anticipates increased visitation leading up to this celestial event. Solar eclipses have proven to be a significant draw for visitors who travel to experience being in its “path of totality.”

 

During the afternoon of April 8, 2024, the moon will pass between the sun and Earth, completely blocking the face of the sun and creating a shadow over much of the Adirondacks. Most of the region will be in this “path of totality” meaning that the most significant part of the moon’s umbra, or shadow, will be directly over the region, plunging it into darkness during the normally bright afternoon hours.

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