Posts Tagged ‘Spruce Beer’

Thursday, December 2, 2021

Raising a glass to the birds

raquette river brewing

Northern New York Audubon and Raquette River Brewing have partnered to create a one-of-a-kind beer. On December 11, the brand new Spruce Tip IPA will be launched at Raquette River Brewing’s Tupper Lake property. The label for the beer can will feature one of the region’s most iconic species: the Spruce Grouse.

Shelly Cihan, Northern NY Audubon’s Vice President, took the lead on this project. “We have been talking about this collaboration for over a year now, and I am thrilled to see this project come to fruition,” said Cihan. “As a bird lover, I’m excited to see a special local species highlighted. As a beer lover, Raquette River is one of my favorite breweries and I am so happy we got to work together.”

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Spruce Beer: An Old Adirondack Favorite

In keeping with last week’s spruce theme — Sprucelets: An Original Adirondack Medicine — is a look at one of the most common drinks in early Adirondack history: spruce beer. Like the aforementioned Sprucelets, it was believed to be of medicinal value due in part to its vitamin C content. Several evergreens share those same properties, and their use dates back centuries.

In one of the earliest mentions of evergreens used as a health aid in North America, there remains disagreement as to which tree along the St. Lawrence River (at today’s Quebec City) was used by Jacques Cartier in 1536 to cure scurvy. His voyage journal says that after learning nearby natives were quite ill with an unknown disease, Cartier quarantined his men on their ships, which were frozen in the ice.

As he noted, the precaution didn’t work. “Not withstanding these defences, the disease begun inside our group, in an unknown manner, as some of us were getting weak, their legs were becoming big and swollen, the nerves as black as coal. The sailors were dotted with drops of blood, and then the disease went to their hips, thighs, shoulders, arms and neck. Their mouths were so infected and rotten that all the flesh fell to the level of the roots of the teeth which had fallen out.” » Continue Reading.


Kid next to water

Kid next to water

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