Posts Tagged ‘summer’

Monday, May 11, 2020

Tupper Arts Little Loggers Kids Show Series

This summer, every Friday morning at 11 AM throughout the months of July and August, Tupper Arts will be presenting the Little Loggers Kids Show Series—a series of events that includes interactive children’s shows, music, magic, dance and theater. The shows take place at the Tupper Lake Sunset Stage Bandshell on the water, come at no cost, and lunches will be provided immediately after courteous of the Aseel Family Fund.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 7, 2020

Tupper Lake announces Summer Music Series

tupper lake bandshellTupper Arts in conjunction with the Village of Tupper Lake will be hosting its 2020 summer music series at the Tupper Lake Sunset Stage. The Monday night concerts are free and open to the public and feature a variety of local bands and plays, with a special event and fireworks for the Fourth of July holiday.

The Tupper Lake Sunset Stage is in Flanders Park at the base of Mill Street, next to the Little Loggers Playground. If inclement weather, the venue will be changed to the Tupper Lake Middle/High School Auditorium at 25 Chaney Ave.

The schedule is as follows: (All shows start at 7 unless otherwise stated)

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 3, 2020

Call for entries: 47th Annual Tupper Lake Art Show

The Tupper Art Center  is currently closed for now due to the quarantine and it’s possible they may delay the opening of the following events or opt for a virtual format. Regardless, they are preparing for a number of events to be happening soon over the coming months:.

They are currently calling for artists for their 47th annual Tupper Lake Art Show, to take place at 106 Park St, Tupper Lake, on June 17 – July 11. Artists may submit up to 4 hanging works of art per individual, of any medium. Tables are available for 3 dimensional projects and floor space will be available for larger works of art. The drop-off is Saturday June 13 and Sunday June 14 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The reception is Wednesday, June 17, 6 to 8 p.m., and the pick-up will be  July 12-13. To learn more about the art show and to find forms to enter, just visit this link.

There will also be an Adirondacks Woodcrafts Show from July 14 – July 30, with the opening reception being on July 14 from 5 – 7 p.m. For more information you can contact info@tupperarts.org


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Ticks: Not a fan of social distancing

tick next to dimeGetting fresh air is more important than ever this coming summer during the public health crises, but it would be wise to remember that both ticks and people are going to be active and outside. Laura Harrington, a professor of entomology, vector biologist, and Director of the CDC Northeast Regional Center for Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases (NEVBD) has shared some tips on how to avoid ticks.

A bacterial infection that causes Lyme disease is the most important tick-borne human infection in the U.S., with around 200,000-300,000 reported cases per year. The blacklegged tick or ‘deer tick’ is the vector of Lyme disease in most of the U.S. It can also transmit other pathogens to people and pets, including the agents that cause babesiosis, anaplasmosis and Powassan disease. Blacklegged ticks are most common in forested areas and shaded trail edges with abundant leaf litter and shrubby plants, Harrington says.

Harrington recommends a few personal protection measures to keep ticks from biting, such as tick repellent, first and foremost. She also recommends light-colored clothing, and to tuck your pantlegs into your socks. It also wouldn’t hurt to treat your clothing with permethrin, or to purchase permethrin-treated clothing. Remember to check yourself for ticks often as well, both while hiking and after you get home! It only takes 24-48 hours after the tick attaches before it can begin to transmit Lyme disease. For other pathogens like the Powassan virus, transmission can happen quickly, so it is good to check as often as possible.

Check for ticks all over your body, including your back, neck, and hairline. If you happen to find a tick, carefully remove it with sharp tweezers by grasping as close to the point of attachment as possible and pulling. Once you are back inside, place your clothes in the dryer for at least 20 minutes, and take a shower (a good place to perform a tick check). You can also place your clothes in a sealed garbage bag to dry later.


Tuesday, April 28, 2020

2020 Seagle Season cancelled due to COVID-19

For the first time in its 105 year history, the Seagle Music Colony in Schroon Lake is cancelling its summer season.

Tony Kostecki and Darren K. Woods, the General and Artistic Directors of the Seagle Music Colony, made the decision for the health and safety of their artists, staff, patrons, and audience members. Seagle leadership did not make this decision lightly and had the following to say about it in an announcement sent this week:

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 21, 2020

COVID-19 related Closings and Delays in the Adirondacks

Updated on 5/29

Great Camp Sagamore main lodgeAs we get closer to summer, and visitors to our region are trying to make plans and figure out what the summer season will bring, we are keeping a close look on popular Adirondack area attractions and putting together this list of closures/delays. This is just the start, we will be adding to it as we go. This is where we’ll add openings, too as they happen (scroll to the bottom of the list to see what’s there now)

Feel free to contribute in the comments section and/or send notices to editor@adirondackalmanack.com

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 10, 2020

The Sembrich Announces its Summer Festival: 20/20 Musical Visionaries

The Sembrich in Bolton Landing has announced this year’s Summer Festival,  titled “20/20 Musical Visionaries.”  Created by Artistic Director Richard Wargo, the season features composers, performers, and educators and takes place June 5 – Sept. 2.

“With Beethoven on the 250th anniversary of his birth as a figurehead, our season is dedicated to extraordinary trailblazing talents in the world of music…We strive, as ever, to create a summer series that is both entertaining and enriching and to present to our audience an eclectic mix of programs in a wide array of styles. There is something for everyone, from chamber music classics to vocal recitals, children’s events, arthouse films, and our ever-popular lakeside World Music Wednesdays,” said Wargo in a press release announcing the Festival.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, September 7, 2015

Distressing Colors: Early Leaf Change An Unhealthy Sign

Early leaf colorIf trees held a race to see which would be among the first to have their leaves turn color, the winners would be losers. Premature leaf color change is a reliable indicator of failing health, and the worse a tree’s condition, the sooner it begins to turn.

Precious few places in the world have a fall color show like ours, and the display that northern hardwoods produce each autumn never fails to fill me with awe and appreciation. But when it starts in July, as was the case again this year on some roadside maples, I know those trees aren’t long for this world. In early August even some forest hardwoods growing on thin rocky soils began to show color, which is also unusual. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 6, 2015

Harvest Time Is Well Worth The Wait


CFLocalLivingFairNCBountyfoodonlyBPWhattamNorth Country gardeners are a patient, hardy lot. Our growing season is short enough in a good year, and this year got off to a very slow start with endless rain and cold temperatures well into July.

While there are many cool season crops that do well up here, most home gardeners spend the summer waiting for the royalty of crops to ripen: tomatoes! » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Amy Ivy: August in the Garden


Cornell farmer education (Amy Ivy Photo)Anyone growing tomatoes or potatoes needs to be on the lookout for signs of late blight. By mid-July this devastating disease had been found on potatoes in western New York and western Vermont.

This means Northern New York is basically surrounded by it and the cool, wet weather we had in June through mid-July created ideal conditions for this disease. Only tomatoes and potatoes are affected by this particular pathogen. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Gardening: Pinch Now for More Flowers

flowers - courtesy Cornell Home Gardening Growing Guide onlineNothing provides a steady shot of color to your yard more than annual flowers. Once they begin to bloom they will keep producing flowers for the rest of the summer. Perennial flowers are beautiful but are usually only in bloom for a couple of weeks. For non-stop color and plenty of flowers for cutting, annual flowers are ideal.

After waiting for seedlings or young transplants to get established and begin to push out growth, the last thing gardeners are inclined to do is cut them back. But some judicious pinching right now will pay off with many more stems and flowers than if they had been left alone. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Adirondack Insects: June Bugs

Photograph taken by Patrick CoinAround the time when the puffy, spherical clusters of seeds appear on dandelions, male hummingbirds are engaging in their courtship flights, and hoards of black flies arrive when the air become humid, June bugs make their annual appearance during the evening around porch lights, street lamps, and well illuminated windows.

When indoors at this time of year after dark, it is common to hear the sound of this hefty, hard-shelled bug repeatedly flying into a screen, continuously beating its wings against a window pane, or buzzing around an outside light, as if attempting to get directly into the source of illumination. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 2, 2014

Ed Kanze: Heat, Sweat, And A Well-Cooked Steak

warning-hotIs it possible to survive time spent in a room so hot that it could fry a steak and eggs? Listen to my tale of a famous series of experiments conducted in England in 1775.

Two of the great botanists of the time, Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, braved the inferno with only minor discomfort and lived to tell the tale. The action heats up in this week’s edition of All Things Natural with Ed Kanze. » Continue Reading.