Posts Tagged ‘The Nature Conservancy’

Saturday, May 8, 2021

The Cabins that Time Forgot

rundown cabinThe Adirondack Forest Preserve is celebrated as one of the world’s best-protected wilderness reserves, but of course this is New York State, not the distant, untrodden surface of Venus; with precious few exceptions all of the lands that are now “forever wild” were once privately owned, and many parcels were developed to one degree or another before the state acquired them for the Forest Preserve. If you’ve enjoyed any of the Adirondack Park’s “blockbuster” purchases over the last quarter-century, such as Little Tupper Lake, Round Lake, the Essex Chain of Lakes, Boreas Ponds, or Madawaska Flow, you have explored land that was once populated by dozens of modest hunting camps.

I was an early visitor at all of these properties, exploring their secrets while the ink was still wet on the deeds. In 1998, just weeks after the “William C. Whitney Area” opened to the public, I found a small cabin on the north shore of Little Tupper Lake that even DEC staff didn’t seem to know about. At Madawaska Flow in 2004 and Round Lake in 2006, I ventured into recently abandoned cabins that stood on expired leases, quietly awaiting their demolition. These structures reminded me that what I had come to explore as “wilderness” had been perceived and used as something slightly different a few years earlier.

Because of these experiences, as well as my interest in Adirondack history, I have never been deluded into thinking our wilderness is a people-less place; it may be the natural landscape that attracts me and fills my daydreams, but I am also familiar with (and fascinated by) the human story that haunts the Forest Preserve.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 24, 2021

Orgs Release “Toolkit” for New Yorkers Fighting Climate Change

solar panels stock photoFree, Easy-to-Use Guide Provides Resources to Build Support for Local Wind and Solar Projects to Reap Community Benefits

To help community members who want to build support for local clean energy projects, The Nature Conservancy in New York and New Yorkers for Clean Power have published a toolkit to support their efforts. Entitled Building Out a Clean Energy Future, the free, online toolkit provides background, strategies and resources for New Yorkers regardless of prior knowledge about clean energy.

Identifying common barriers and outlining actions to manage and overcome them, the toolkit shares steps that community members can take to support renewable energy projects in their city, town, or village and help bring about the many benefits of clean energy including cleaner air to breathe, a stronger economy with good-paying local jobs, and less carbon pollution, the driver of climate change.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 8, 2020

Groups work to strengthen wildlife pathway between Catskills, Adirondacks

This month, the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy (MHLC), in partnership with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), was awarded a Mohawk Watershed grant for $88,744 through the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Mohawk Watershed Program. The grant stream is intended to protect the Mohawk Basin and help mitigate the impacts of climate change.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 6, 2020

Raising awareness about invasive species

 The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is calling for Adirondack outdoor enthusiasts to join a state-wide effort to protect trails, waterways, and habitats during New York’s seventh annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW). This year, from June 7-13, APIPP is going digital by holding online trainings and awareness initiatives to help community members protect the environment while maintaining safe social distancing guidelines. 

Invasive species are non-native plants, animals, and insects that can throw native ecosystems out of balance, cause harm to human health, and put economically important industries such as farming, fishing, forestry, and tourism at risk. We all have a critical role to play in preventing the spread of damaging invasive species, and with increased knowledge, we can work together to steward the Adirondacks. What can you do to help? 

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 14, 2020

TNC welcomes two new staffers

The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter is pleased to announce the addition of two new team members: Amanda Dunham Ely has joined the team as communications and community engagement manager, and Emily-Bell Dinan has joined as education and communications coordinator for the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP). 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Nature Conservancy Adk Chapter: New Board Members

The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter has added three members to its board of trustees: David and Hannah Darrin, a father and daughter with longstanding ties to conservation efforts in New York and elsewhere, and Takeyce Walter, a painter whose work has prominently featured the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 4, 2018

The Nature Conservancy’s Nature Fair

The Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy is bringing science and nature together for a one day nature fair at their Keene Valley, New York office. Though a lot of the Nature Conservancy’s hard work is behind the scenes, the August 9 celebration is an opportunity for the staff to showcase their specialties and demonstrate how they continue to work to support communities and nature.

According to Associate Director of Philanthropy Erin Walkow, the idea for a nature fair sounded like the perfect way to connect the public with all the different departments within The Nature Conservancy. » Continue Reading.