Posts Tagged ‘The Nature Conservancy’

Monday, April 8, 2024

Solutions in our backyard

black spruce

Last week I sent you a story on how climate change could be triggering a mass movement of species northward. The Adirondacks could be a critical habitat for those migrants.

So, how do we help?

During an interview with a wildlife connectivity expert from The Nature Conservancy, I asked that question. It turns out the solutions to protecting migrating species are mostly uncomplicated: Conserve the land you have.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, November 27, 2023

Effort to protect Lake George hemlocks continues

Dome-Island-HWA-Treatment-
Lake George, NY—The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP), a program of The Nature Conservancy, has wrapped up its 2023 hemlock woolly adelgid treatments on Lake George’s Dome Island.

John Apperson donated Dome Island to the Conservancy in 1956. It was one of the first land donations to the organization.

“John entrusted this island to The Nature Conservancy, and we are honored to carry out his wishes by being a responsible steward of this Lake George landmark,” said Peg Olsen,
Adirondack Director of The Nature Conservancy in New York. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 18, 2023

APIPP to host Invasive Species in a Changing Climate webinar, Sept. 20

APIPP invasive species webinar graphic.

Keene Valley, NY- The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is hosting a free webinar on how climate change could make the Adirondacks more hospitable to invasive species. “Invasive Species in a Changing Climate” is scheduled for 10-11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20. The webinar will begin with an overview of what makes a species invasive before diving into how longer summers and shorter, milder winters in the Adirondacks are likely to make the region more favorable to invasive species. The impact of climate change on managing invasive species and an overview of which invasive species tend to benefit the most from climate change will also be discussed.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 27, 2023

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program announces free summer education series

Photography for Nature Lovers APIPP graphic

Keene Valley – The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is gearing up for a summer of diverse educational programs on the importance of reporting, managing and preventing the spread of invasive species by offering a free summer education series. On June 9, APIPP will celebrate New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week with two programs, one field trip and one webinar.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 16, 2023

APIPP Adds Tip Sheet to Its Free Outreach Materials

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program logo.

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) has added a new tip sheet to its library of free outreach materials just in time for the start of the summer construction season. “Best Management Practices for Moving Topsoil and Fill” was developed with highway department crews and construction contractors in mind, but it can be referenced by anyone doing a project that involves moving excavated materials.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 22, 2023

Field Training for Invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid set for March 11

closeup of hemlock woolly adelgid

Bolton Landing, NY – The public is invited to attend a hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) field survey training on Saturday, March 11, from 10 am to noon, at Hearthstone Point Campground in Lake George.

Program leaders will give an overview of winter outing safety skills, while teaching how to identify hemlock trees, survey for hemlock woolly adelgid, and report findings using iMapInvasives.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 21, 2023

APIPP: Forest Pest Hunters training webinar set for Jan. 24

Lake George

ADIRONDACKS – Forest Pest Hunter volunteer Bill Widrig has reported more than 300 forest pest survey observations, and he isn’t done yet. Widrig was among the first to join the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s Forest Pest Hunters effort when it began in 2021.

 

“Our property on the lake has old growth hemlock, some over 200 years old, that are very special to us,” Widrig said. “As hemlock woolly adelgid is a threat to these trees and all other hemlocks in the Northeast, I felt that I could not in good conscience just stand by and do nothing to help stop the spread of this pest.”

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 10, 2022

Invasive Species at Our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit set for Oct. 19

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE—A summit to address two invasive species that are a threat to the Adirondacks will include a discussion on new research that shows a link between hydrilla and the death of eagles in the Southeastern United States. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program will host a free symposium, “Invasive Species at our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit,” from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake. The event will cover two species that could dramatically impact Adirondack forests and freshwater ecosystems: hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), a forest pest, and hydrilla, an aquatic invasive plant.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, September 12, 2022

Free Webinar “Forest Pest Hunters: Surveying for Beech Leaf Disease” Scheduled for Sept. 15

ADIRONDACKS—Beech leaf disease is in the Adirondacks, and scientists need help gathering data on the newly emerging forest pest. To teach community scientists how to identify and report beech leaf disease, the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program will host a free webinar from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 15, called “Forest Pest Hunters: Surveying for Beech Leaf Disease.”

 

Beech leaf disease was first detected in Ohio in 2012 and in New York state in 2018. In 2022, the state Department of Environmental Conservation confirmed the presence of beech leaf disease in over 30 counties in New York including Herkimer County, the first documented infestation in the Adirondack region.  Beech leaf disease can kill mature beech trees in six to 10 years, while young trees can be killed in as little as two to three years.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 25, 2022

ADK, The Nature Conservancy improve access at Silver Lake Bog Preserve

 

July 25, 2022 — Black Brook, NY — The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Lake Bog Preserve’s nature trail is now more safe, sustainable, and accessible after a month of work by ADK’s professional trail crew. Part of a multi-year effort to make the Silver Lake Bog Preserve more accessible to all, The Nature Conservancy in the Adirondacks contracted with ADK to rebuild a bridge, reroute unsustainable trail sections, and establish a formal trail to the bluff viewpoint, which includes wooden ladders to increase safety.

The Silver Lake Bog Preserve is a publicly accessible 98-acre property that features a boardwalk that winds through an ancient peatland bog, the unsung hero of carbon capture, hardwood forests, and spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. The improved trail travels 1.5 miles through the Preserve and features a 200-foot bluff overlooking Silver Lake and Whiteface Mountain.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Free virtual webinar “Backyard Invasives” set for July 20

ADIRONDACKS – Anyone can help prevent the spread of invasive species, even without leaving their yard. That’s the gist of the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s free webinar “Backyard
Invasives—Identification and Management of Terrestrial Invasive Species,” which will run from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 20.

“A lot of invasive species tend to grow on forest edges and roadsides, and some get planted intentionally, making people’s yards an ideal habitat,” said APPIP Terrestrial Invasive Species Coordinator Becca Bernacki.

Invasive species are plants, insects, fish and other animals that are not native to a region and cause ecological, economic or human health harm. They can reproduce quickly, outcompete native vegetation and are often spread by human activity.

Yards not only provide a welcoming habitat for invasives, they’re also heavily traveled upon, which increases the opportunity for plants and seeds to be unintentionally relocated. Mowing and landscaping are two ways unwanted plants can be spread. And while it isn’t easy to control the spread of invasive species, understanding how to identify and manage them are things anyone can do.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 25, 2022

Lake Protectors Volunteer Training Scheduled for June 28

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is inviting volunteers to join its Lake Protectors program and is kicking off summer with its first (of three) Lake Protectors training sessions from 9-11:30 a.m. on June 28.

“Being a Lake Protector is fun, easy and a great way to help Adirondack lakes,” said Brian Greene, APIPP’s Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator.

Since the program’s inception in 2002, hundreds of volunteer Lake Protectors have surveyed more than 460 lakes in the Adirondacks, of which more than 75-percent do not have invasive species present.

Participation in the program is simple. After taking a training course, every volunteer is encouraged to adopt a waterbody of their choice and commit to surveying that pond or lake at least once during the summer. Many Lake Protectors, like Saranac Lake author Caperton Tissot, view the program as a way to spend time on a favorite waterbody while also helping to protect it from the threat of invasive species. Tissot has been a volunteer Lake Protector since 2009. In an interview last summer, she said her favorite place to survey is Barnum Pond in Paul Smiths because there are no buildings nearby, she rarely sees another boat and the shoreline varies from rocky outcrops to forests and bogs.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 6, 2022

Saranac Lake: Community events set for Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 6-12

lake flower boat stewards

New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is Monday, June 6 through Sunday, June 12, with several community events planned in Saranac Lake.

ISAW is a statewide effort to promote public understanding of invasive species and increase knowledge on the impacts they have on our waterbodies and woodlands. Local events will take place on June 6 and 8 and are co-sponsored by the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) and The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP).
“Our Adirondack waterways, forests, and farmlands are important for recreation, economic sustainability, and basic ecosystem functions,” said AWI Deputy Director Zoë Smith. “The annual Invasive Species Awareness Week is a chance for people learn about protecting our beloved lakes, rivers and forests from invasive species that threaten our environment and cause irreparable harm.”

Saturday, April 30, 2022

Nature Conservancy seeks volunteers for spring cleanup

nature conservancy

Are you ready to roll up your sleeves to help care for local trails?

The Adirondack chapter of The Nature Conservancy is doing some spring cleaning and is looking for volunteers to help us at the Boquet River Nature Preserve on Saturday, May 7, 10AM-2PM.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 17, 2022

Calling on New York State Leaders to Protect Lake Champlain from Invasive Species

 

round gobyBy Peg Olsen

Here in the Adirondack region, we know how special Lake Champlain is. It provides year-round recreational opportunities for residents and visitors alike and drives our local economies. It hosts some of the best fishing in the nation and is home to an abundance of wildlife. Lake Champlain provides so much to our communities, and now we need the state to step up and protect it.

Invasive species outcompete native wildlife and cause severe harm to our ecosystems and our economies. Their proliferation can lead to the extinction of native plants and animals and threaten our way of life.

Lake Champlain is facing that threat now, with the looming introduction of invasive round goby. Round goby is a small fish species native to southeastern Europe that arrived in the Great Lakes 31 years ago in a ship’s untreated ballast water. Round gobies aggressively outcompete native fish for habitat and feed on their eggs and young, harming native fisheries and local businesses.

» Continue Reading.



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