Posts Tagged ‘Tourism’

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Pete Nelson: To Address Overuse, Focus on Parking

This Columbus Day weekend I decided to put the issue of overuse in the High Peaks region to a little test.  I visited three of the most crowded trail heads in the area and hiked from two of them.  I also investigated the State’s grand relocation of the Cascade trail and parking.

What I saw confirmed a working theory I have been informally discussing with both private folks and local and state government employees.  The theory isn’t mine, indeed a number of people have the idea.  It’s a simple concept, really: back country overuse can be mitigated in large part simply by addressing parking issues.  In other words, we can manage recreation capacity by more effectively managing transportation capacity. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 9, 2017

A Day On Cascade Mountain: Some Data

On September 16th I hiked Cascade Mountain and wrote about the experience. On that day over 500 people hiked Cascade. I returned the next weekend (on Saturday September 23rd), with a friend and survey sheets and clipboards to ask hikers a series of questions. The interviews took about two minutes and many people graciously answered questions. At busy points, we were both talking with groups as others walked by us. This was a rough survey, undertaken as much to learn about what is necessary for conducting this kind of survey as it was for getting some basic data from the hikers on Cascade Mountain. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Crowded Peaks: Hiking Cascade With 500 Other People

I hiked Cascade Mountain from the Route 73 trailhead on Saturday September 16th. I went to see the crowds, the condition of the trail, and the general scene of what is believed to be the most popular High Peaks hiking trail. In 2015, over 33,000 people signed in at the trailhead register. In 2016, over 42,000 people are believed to have hiked the summit. Near the top there is now an electronic counter.

My whole trip took about five hours in the middle of the day. Many passed me by on the hike up and many others were hiking down the mountain during my ascent. I stayed on the summit about 90 minutes, which was gloriously sunny with the lightest of breezes. On the summit I counted people twice, with each count topping 100. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Annual Adirondack Tourism Study Expanded, Results Posted

The latest Leisure Travel Information Study results provide comprehensive traveler demographic insight for the Adirondacks’ Essex, Franklin and Hamilton counties.

For the 13th year in a row, the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) contracted an independent third party to conduct a Leisure Travel Information Study. This year, ROOST again engaged PlaceMaking researchers to conduct the study, which includes a regional return on marketing investment analysis, plus extensive traveler data for Essex, and for the first time, Franklin and Hamilton counties as well. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 17, 2017

When The World Discovers Your Favorite Adirondack Spot

jay mountain Maybe 15 years ago, having completed the 46 High Peaks and just becoming aware that there were indeed other trails in the Park, I was searching for new options when I stumbled across a brief description of the seldom-climbed Jay Mountain, the capstone of the Jay Range, smack in the center of the Jay Wilderness off of Jay Mountain Road between the communities of Jay and Upper Jay. Everything in Jay is named Jay. People even name their goldfish Jay. Less to remember that way, I suppose.

It was a mountain that, it was said, only “the locals” climbed, but if that were the case, those rascally locals weren’t talking. People whom I was certain had hiked Jay clammed up, guarding the secret with the same passion as one trying to keep the nuclear codes away from President Trump.

Of course this only meant that I made up my mind that I would find the trailhead or die. Find it I eventually did, but it wasn’t within a hundred yards of where it was supposed to be, and was marked only by three sorry old stones masquerading as a cairn. I do believe it took longer to find the trail than it did to hike it. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Fort Ticonderoga Announces Annual Economic Impact Report

fort ticonderoga

The results of a 2016 study by Magellan Strategy Group, commissioned by the Fort Ticonderoga Association, analyzing Fort Ticonderoga’s impact upon the surrounding region have been released.

According to the study, the site generates a total of $12.1 million annually in economic impact. The total includes visitor spending from tourists; spending by the Fort Ticonderoga Association in its daily operations; the indirect and induced impacts created by labor income as it flows into the regional economy; and tax revenue generated by that spending.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 10, 2017

Buzz Over Adirondack High Peaks Helicopter Tours

A Go Aviation helicopter flies low over Duck Hole in the High Peaks Wilderness. Chip Moeser hiked fifteen miles from Lake Placid in early July to spend the night at Duck Hole deep in the High Peaks Wilderness. He was looking for quiet, but in the late afternoon, a helicopter started descending from overhead.

“It was coming in like it was going to land,” Moeser said, adding that it got as close as ten feet to the ground before taking off.

At first, he had assumed it was a state helicopter. In fact, it was owned by Go Aviation, which this summer started flying helicopter tours out of Lake Placid and Lake Clear. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 27, 2017

Glamping Catches On Alongside The Forest Preserve

adirondack safari glampingWith New York State officials contemplating new ways to induce economic development in the Adirondack Park, the idea of connecting communities more directly to the surrounding Forest Preserve makes plenty of sense.

As Governor Cuomo said at the 2017 Adirondack Challenge this summer:

“You want to develop the asset (the Adirondack Park) because we need jobs, we need the economy, we need tourism. It has to be done in a way that doesn’t disrupt or deteriorate the asset. Because the Adirondack Park is not just an economic asset, it’s not just a state park, it really is a gift from God. I believe that. There is a spirituality to the Adirondack[s] … that is undeniable. And the last thing we would want to do is diminish that asset. Our goal is to leave it even better than before for our children.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 26, 2017

Among the Rocks: The Pottersville Cave Man

stone bridge rock shop A brown, irregularly shaped hunk of fossilized dinosaur dung is circulating around the stone-floored rock shop.

The middle-school students, surrounded by shelves full of amethyst, pyrite, quartz crystals, and cracked open geodes, let their hands roam over the hunk and then pass it along. They don’t know that the mystery rock they’re scrutinizing is a chunk of prehistoric waste. Greg Beckler, owner of Natural Stone Bridge and Caves, will tell them eventually.

This game of pass the poop continues in a semi-circle as Beckler encourages the kids to really explore the fossil. Dip their fingers into its cracks and seams. Give the poop a deep, full inhale. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

New Tupper Lake Regional Marketing Manager Named

Tupper Lake LogoThe Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has announced the promotion of Katie Stuart to the position of Tupper Lake Regional Marketing Manager.

In her new role, Stuart is expected to serve as a liaison between community stakeholders, travelers, and ROOST, and supports the implementation of marketing strategies for the Tupper Lake area. She was introduced to destination marketing via an internship at ROOST during the summer of 2015, and after graduating from Keuka College in 2017, joined ROOST full time as Tupper Lake/Hamilton County Marketing Assistant. She now fills the role formerly held by Michelle Clement, who was promoted to ROOST Director of Marketing in July. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 7, 2017

Saranac Lake Area Tourism Council Reestablished

saranac lake tourism logoLocal leaders of Saranac Lake have announced the revival of the Saranac Lake Area Tourism Council. The group is made up of representatives from local government, as well as businesses and nonprofits with a stake in the local tourism economy. According to an announcement made to the press, the council’s membership includes representatives from the arts and culture, recreation, and wellness sectors. Representatives from local lodging amenties and tourism organizations also hold seats on the Council.

The Saranac Lake Area Tourism Council originally formed several years ago as a collaboration of local government, business, and civic organizations during a transition period in local tourism promotion. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Tyler Socash: Social Media and the Adirondack Backcountry

social media in the high peaksWhile navigating the spellbinding terrain along the Pacific Crest Trail, I found it difficult to resist the temptation to take photos.

Each endless vista around each corner was more jaw-dropping than the last! As I hiked onward, smartphone in hand, impermanence was weighed against the magnitude of the moment. “After all, you may never see these places again,” reminded my sage hiking partner. I had to contemplate whether looking at the staggering scenery through an electronic screen was detaching me from the present experience. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 23, 2017

Pete Nelson: Don’t Overreact to High Peaks Use

Overuse in portions of the High Peaks is a real and growing problem, exacerbated by trends in social media and the expanding desire to count-off summits.  It has been documented extensively here in the Almanack.  But in the last few weeks these discussions have reached a rolling boil with a bit too much hyperbole for me.   A range of ideas has been raised, a number of them falling under the general concept of limiting access to the High Peaks, including permit systems, licensing schemes, daily caps and so on.  Some of these limiting suggestions have been accompanied by exclusionary rhetoric with which I strongly disagree, along the lines of “Why are we trying to get more people here?” or “I like my (town, street, access) the way it is, without all the visitors.”  I agree that increasing use in parts of the High Peaks is a real issue, and I have written about various aspects of the problem for several years.  But the exclusionary sentiments I’m starting to hear are where I draw the line. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 22, 2017

Wild Center Announces One-Millionth Visitor

Ollie the Otter celebrates the millionth visitor Andrew Chrien, with Leah Valerio - Curator, Colleen Chrien, Charlie Wall and Stephanie Ratcliffe - Executive Director.Less than five years after The Wild Center in Tupper Lake welcomed its first 500,000 visitors, on July 18th, 2017 just after 12:30 pm it celebrated eight-year old Andrew Chrien of South Carolina as the one-millionth person to walk through the Center’s doors.

Andrew, accompanied by his siblings Tyler, 6, Laura 4, and Mattie, 2, as well as his mother, Colleen Chrien, and grandparents, Charlie and Laurie Wall, was visiting The Wild Center for the first time. Upon finding out they were the millionth visitor, Andrew experienced a flash mob by staff of the Waggle Dance, a figure-eight dance usually done by honey bees, and received a celebratory gift basket, including a two-year family membership which equates to just over 1,000,000 minutes of Wild Center experiences. Andrew and everyone else visiting also received honey sticks and seed packets in honor of the Wild Center’s Summer of Pollinators and partnership with the Adirondack Pollinator Project. The celebration wrapped up with cake for all. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 17, 2017

Efforts Underway To Address Crowds In The High Peaks

hikers on Big Slide Mt on a prime autumn dayhikers on Big Slide Mt on a prime autumn day The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) owns land with trailheads for some of the most popular mountains in the High Peaks Wilderness, but you wouldn’t know that from their recent promotions on social media and traditional print publications. That’s because the club does not want to exacerbate overcrowding in the High Peaks.

Instead of encouraging people to climb Mount Marcy and Algonquin Peak, ADK is teaching people backcountry ethics, including Leave No Trace principles. “People are coming no matter what, so we don’t need to promote it, and what we need to promote is how to recreate responsibly,” said Julia Goren, ADK’s education director and summit-steward coordinator.

The education campaign is just one of several ways that ADK, the state Department of Environmental Conservation, and other organizations are addressing the overcrowding issue. » Continue Reading.


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