Posts Tagged ‘Tourism’

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Dick Beamish: Adirondack Rail Trail For All

As the Adirondack Park Agency once again ponders the fate of the Tri-Lakes rail corridor, the return of a temporary, for-profit rail-bike business is being considered for the stretch of track between Saranac Lake and Lake Clear.

The popularity of these machines gives a hint of the potential benefits that will accrue from a bike path on this state-owned right-of-way once the tracks are removed. This much-discussed Adirondack Rail Trail now awaits a final okay from the APA and perhaps (here we go again!) a final round of hearings on the state’s Unit Management Plan governing use of the rail corridor. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 3, 2018

Adirondack Wild: Stop the Rush to Accommodate Overuse

Hikers on Cascade Mountain, eastern High Peaks Wilderness What follows is a press release issued by Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve:

At public meetings held in Albany and Newcomb this week, the non-profit advocate Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve told the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and NYS Adirondack Park Agency (APA) that the agencies are rushing to approve complex amendments to management plans for the High Peaks Wilderness and nearby Forest Preserve units. Such haste risks exposing these wilderness landscapes to more overuse and degradation of their natural resources and wild character.

The agencies are on course to approve the amendments in just over 45 days, or half the time that the agencies previously agreed should be taken to consider complex unit management plans for “forever wild” state lands. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 17, 2018

Adirondack Hut-to-Hut: Trails and Lodging Report Released

Photo by Phil Brown 2016. View of Gothics from Boreas Ponds.The final report on the three-year study to develop an Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging System plan to enhance recreation-based tourism and help revitalize hamlet centers has been released to the public.

The report lays out regional hut-to-hut networks throughout the Adirondack Park, which could be linked together into a park-wide system.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, January 22, 2018

State’s Frontier Town Plan Missing Key Transportation Piece

frontier townLast Thursday the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) approved New York State’s plan to build a 91-site camping, equestrian and day use area at the site of the former Frontier Town in North Hudson.

This is the first part of a multi-part strategy to develop the entire site into a gateway with a mix of private and public amenities, businesses and recreational assets. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 14, 2018

New Videos Highlight Life In The Adirondacks

roost to host adirondack destination marketing solutionThe Northern Adirondack Board of REALTORS (NABOR), in conjunction with the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST), unveiled a package of videos aimed at highlighting Adirondack communities as a desirable place to live, work and play.

The videos are designed to inspire and encourage people to relocate here by showcasing the regions’ assets, including the natural beauty, vast outdoor recreation, diversity, quality schools, and tight-knit communities. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 7, 2017

Frontier Town Campground Moves Forward, Meetings Set

North Hudson GatewayThe Adirondack Park Agency has announced that it has deemed DEC’s application complete for the Frontier Town Campground, Equestrian and Day Use Area along the Schroon River in North Hudson. State and local officials have been touting the proposed facility as a “Gateway to the Adirondacks.”

The plan proposes an accessible public campground at the site of the former Frontier Town theme park. The campground would include RV, tent, and equestrian camp sites and facilities, and trails connecting to the snowmobile trails leading to Schroon Lake and Ticonderoga, and a new trail to Newcomb being proposed in the yet unapproved Boreas Ponds Tract Management Plan. The campground is part of the Upper Hudson Recreation Hub Master Plan.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, December 4, 2017

ROOST Hosting Tupper Lake Marketing Review

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has invited all Tupper Lake area municipal leaders, businesses, organizations, and individuals to attend a brief regional destination marketing review, followed by a reception, at Big Tupper Brewing on Thursday, December 7th, from 5 to 6:30 pm.

The agenda will include a brief presentation by ROOST staff, time for Q&A, followed by a networking opportunity with light refreshments and a cash bar.  » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 28, 2017

New Hamilton Co Marketing Manager

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has announced the addition of Beth Lomnitzer as the Hamilton County Regional Marketing Manager.

In her new part-time position, she is expected to serve as a liaison between community stakeholders, travelers, and ROOST, and support the implementation of destination marketing strategies for the county. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Pete Nelson: To Address Overuse, Focus on Parking

This Columbus Day weekend I decided to put the issue of overuse in the High Peaks region to a little test.  I visited three of the most crowded trail heads in the area and hiked from two of them.  I also investigated the State’s grand relocation of the Cascade trail and parking.

What I saw confirmed a working theory I have been informally discussing with both private folks and local and state government employees.  The theory isn’t mine, indeed a number of people have the idea.  It’s a simple concept, really: back country overuse can be mitigated in large part simply by addressing parking issues.  In other words, we can manage recreation capacity by more effectively managing transportation capacity. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 9, 2017

A Day On Cascade Mountain: Some Data

On September 16th I hiked Cascade Mountain and wrote about the experience. On that day over 500 people hiked Cascade. I returned the next weekend (on Saturday September 23rd), with a friend and survey sheets and clipboards to ask hikers a series of questions. The interviews took about two minutes and many people graciously answered questions. At busy points, we were both talking with groups as others walked by us. This was a rough survey, undertaken as much to learn about what is necessary for conducting this kind of survey as it was for getting some basic data from the hikers on Cascade Mountain. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Crowded Peaks: Hiking Cascade With 500 Other People

I hiked Cascade Mountain from the Route 73 trailhead on Saturday September 16th. I went to see the crowds, the condition of the trail, and the general scene of what is believed to be the most popular High Peaks hiking trail. In 2015, over 33,000 people signed in at the trailhead register. In 2016, over 42,000 people are believed to have hiked the summit. Near the top there is now an electronic counter.

My whole trip took about five hours in the middle of the day. Many passed me by on the hike up and many others were hiking down the mountain during my ascent. I stayed on the summit about 90 minutes, which was gloriously sunny with the lightest of breezes. On the summit I counted people twice, with each count topping 100. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Annual Adirondack Tourism Study Expanded, Results Posted

The latest Leisure Travel Information Study results provide comprehensive traveler demographic insight for the Adirondacks’ Essex, Franklin and Hamilton counties.

For the 13th year in a row, the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) contracted an independent third party to conduct a Leisure Travel Information Study. This year, ROOST again engaged PlaceMaking researchers to conduct the study, which includes a regional return on marketing investment analysis, plus extensive traveler data for Essex, and for the first time, Franklin and Hamilton counties as well. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 17, 2017

When The World Discovers Your Favorite Adirondack Spot

jay mountain Maybe 15 years ago, having completed the 46 High Peaks and just becoming aware that there were indeed other trails in the Park, I was searching for new options when I stumbled across a brief description of the seldom-climbed Jay Mountain, the capstone of the Jay Range, smack in the center of the Jay Wilderness off of Jay Mountain Road between the communities of Jay and Upper Jay. Everything in Jay is named Jay. People even name their goldfish Jay. Less to remember that way, I suppose.

It was a mountain that, it was said, only “the locals” climbed, but if that were the case, those rascally locals weren’t talking. People whom I was certain had hiked Jay clammed up, guarding the secret with the same passion as one trying to keep the nuclear codes away from President Trump.

Of course this only meant that I made up my mind that I would find the trailhead or die. Find it I eventually did, but it wasn’t within a hundred yards of where it was supposed to be, and was marked only by three sorry old stones masquerading as a cairn. I do believe it took longer to find the trail than it did to hike it. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Fort Ticonderoga Announces Annual Economic Impact Report

fort ticonderoga

The results of a 2016 study by Magellan Strategy Group, commissioned by the Fort Ticonderoga Association, analyzing Fort Ticonderoga’s impact upon the surrounding region have been released.

According to the study, the site generates a total of $12.1 million annually in economic impact. The total includes visitor spending from tourists; spending by the Fort Ticonderoga Association in its daily operations; the indirect and induced impacts created by labor income as it flows into the regional economy; and tax revenue generated by that spending.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 10, 2017

Buzz Over Adirondack High Peaks Helicopter Tours

A Go Aviation helicopter flies low over Duck Hole in the High Peaks Wilderness. Chip Moeser hiked fifteen miles from Lake Placid in early July to spend the night at Duck Hole deep in the High Peaks Wilderness. He was looking for quiet, but in the late afternoon, a helicopter started descending from overhead.

“It was coming in like it was going to land,” Moeser said, adding that it got as close as ten feet to the ground before taking off.

At first, he had assumed it was a state helicopter. In fact, it was owned by Go Aviation, which this summer started flying helicopter tours out of Lake Placid and Lake Clear. » Continue Reading.


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