Posts Tagged ‘Trout’

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Hendrickson Hatch Fly Fishing Tournament June 1-2

Hendrickson Hatch Fly Fishing TournamentThe annual Hendrickson Hatch Fly Fishing Tournament has been set for Saturday and Sunday, June 1-2 in Malone.

Tournament registration will run from 8 to 9:45 am at North Country Community College in Malone. Fishing will begin at 10 am on Saturday, and ends at 1 pm on Sunday. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 30, 2019

Trout Season Opens Monday, April 1

brown troutMonday, April 1st, is opening day for trout fishing.  Currently, rivers and brooks in much of the Adirondacks are dangerous or difficult or impossible to access due to deep snow and ice. Rivers and brooks in the Southern Adirondacks and eastern valleys are open but there remains some patches of ice and snow along the banks, and water temperatures are extremely cold.

Water levels will rise as snow melts this weekend. There remains deep snow in the mountains, 6 to 8 feet on some summits, so expect waters to rise significantly from morning to afternoon during the warm days of spring. Monitor water levels to ensure your safety.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 20, 2019

My First Trout and The Rainmakers

My advice to nine-year-old wanna-be trout anglers is: “Do not wear a sweater.” Repeat: “Do not wear a sweater.”

My earliest trout fishing days in and around Bakers Mills in today’s Siamese Ponds Wilderness Area were frustrating because my own fishhook invariably caught mainly my sweater. And we mostly used night crawlers not artificial flies then. Better to wear something less adept at snagging stray hooks. Try thick vinyl, maybe. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 30, 2018

Angling Tips: Help Trout and Salmon Beat the Heat

brown troutThis spring, trout and trout anglers have benefited from abundant rainfall and cool weather conditions that promote the growth and survival of trout and salmon. However, with the forecast for high temperatures this weekend through next week, it is important to remember that trout and salmon are coldwater sportfish that can experience serious physical stress whenever water temperatures climb above 70° Fahrenheit. Heat stressed fish often seek pockets of cold water created by upwelling groundwater, small feeder streams, or water released from deep reservoirs. These refuges allow trout to avoid or recover from potentially fatal levels of heat stress. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 14, 2018

More Adirondack Lake Trout Monitoring Needed

spawning lake trout Lake Trout are designated species of Greatest Conservation Need in NY, based on the reduction of cold, well oxygenated waters in lakes due to climate change.

Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush are one of two native salmonines to the interior Adirondacks, Brook Trout, S. fontinalis being the other.

However, unlike Brook Trout, which can be found from small headwater streams to deeper lakes, Lake Trout reside in the hypolimnion (bottom) of lakes during the majority of the year, where water temperatures are most suitable. The depth of the hypolimnion depends on many factors, including latitude, size of the lake, and the height of surrounding land that offers protection from the wind.  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 29, 2018

2018 Trout Fishing Season Opens Sunday

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenNew York’s 2018 trout fishing season kicks off Sunday, April 1st.

This year DEC is expected to stock 2.26 million catchable-size trout in 315 lakes and ponds and roughly 2,845 miles of streams across the state.

It’s estimated about 647,000 anglers fish for trout in New York State. Fishing conditions are currently less than optimal in the Adirondacks, though ice and deep snow is beginning to melt and conditions will improve as the weather warms. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Plattsburgh Meeting on Trout Stream Management Planned

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that it is holding a public meeting on September 26, 2017, at the Town of Plattsburgh Town Hall at 7 pm as part of a series of meetings on trout stream management.

DEC Region 5 Fisheries staff will provide a 30-minute presentation describing DEC’s current trout stream management and key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Trout stream anglers and others will have an opportunity after the presentation to provide comments regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cornell’s History of Protecting Adirondack Fisheries

2016 Cornell Adirondack Fisheries Research Program Boat CrewI recently wrote about the impacts of acid rain, which results from burning fossil fuels, on Adirondack lakes and streams. But, did you know that Cornell University has been a leader in efforts to safeguard natural fisheries within the Adirondacks and to protect them from the damaging effects of acid rain, invasive species, and climate change for well-over half-a-century?

In fact, Cornell’s cold-water fishery research has historically focused on the Adirondack region. And just last year, the New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University (CALS) established a new faculty fellowship in fisheries and aquatic sciences, named for the late (and extremely-well-respected) Professor of Fishery Biology, Dr. Dwight A. Webster; the educator who laid the groundwork for what is now the Adirondack Fishery Research Program (AFRP). » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 31, 2017

DEC Announces Public Meetings On Trout Stream Management

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that public meetings will be held in each DEC region this fall to provide an overview of the state’s approach to trout stream management.

The meetings will also elicit feedback from trout stream anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of these waters. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 16, 2016

Comments Sought Champlain Basin Regulations

Lake-Champlain-BasinThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will hold two public information meetings and a public hearing in Plattsburgh on the proposed rulemaking to upgrade the classifications of certain surface waters within the Lake Champlain drainage basin.

The proposed rulemaking is to amend Part 830 of Title 6 of the Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR) to upgrade the classifications of certain surface waters in order to meet the “fishable” goal of the federal Clean Water Act.  In addition, some waters would be upgraded from “non-trout” to “trout” waters. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 3, 2016

An Innovative Culvert Replacement At Otis Brook In Jay

Aluminum Arch CulvertThe Town of Jay, Ausable River Association, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and NYS Department of State are restoring an upstream portion of Otis Brook, a tributary of the Ausable River’s East Branch.

The partners are replacing an undersized, 30-inch pipe culvert under Jay Mountain Road – a frequent source of flooding that requires repeated maintenance by the town highway department – with a 17-foot wide aluminum arch culvert designed and sized specifically for the site. The new culvert will allow Otis Brook, its population of native brook trout, and other wildlife to move unimpeded under the road. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 23, 2016

Adirondack Trout And Rising Water Temperatures

troutBrook Trout and Lake Trout, coldwater species are found in many lakes, ponds, and streams within the Adirondacks. They require cold, well oxygenated waters that are clean, to survive. With the increasing in overall temperatures, I felt it was time to explore the impact that these rising temperatures would have on our fish populations. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 28, 2016

Trout Power Event At Great Camp Sagamore

trout power

On Father’s Day Weekend, June 16-19, 2016, catch-and-release anglers and conservationists can assist in a two-day creel study and three-day celebration of wild trout and historic conservation and protection at Great Camp Sagamore near Raquette Lake.

Anglers participating in this Trout Power event will be able to choose from over 10 miles of secluded and rarely-fished sections of the South Inlet Watershed to fish, part of a weekend-long data collection survey of wild fish. Anglers will receive training on how to catch, photograph, and record their catch. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 3, 2016

Women’s Division Returns To Ausable Two-Fly Challenge

Fly fishing on the Ausable in Wilmington (John Warren photo)The 17th annual Ausable Two-Fly Challenge, a catch-and-release trout tournament, is taking place May 20-21 with a reintroduced a women’s division.

A portion of registrations will be donated to Casting for Recovery, which seeks to enhance the quality of life of women with breast cancer through a combination of education, support and fly fishing. Casting for Recovery’s retreats are open to breast cancer survivors of all ages, in all stages of treatment and recovery, and are free to participants.

The Two-Fly Challenge begins Friday, May 20, with a day of fishing followed by a Fly Tyer’s Reception where anglers can share the day’s experiences on the river while learning new fly tying skills, or taking part in the fly casting competition; the Seth Warden Duo will perform live music.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 13, 2016

DEC Collects 16.8 Million Eggs For NYS Fish Hatcheries

 Collecting heritage straing brook trout eggs.The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and partner agencies collected 16.8 million eggs for the state’s fish hatcheries, the agency has announced.  Each year, DEC staff collect eggs from wild and captive adult fish to rear at DEC fish hatcheries.

After the eggs are taken they are incubated at DEC’s state hatcheries.  After hatching, they are fed and cared for by DEC hatchery staff until they reach target stocking sizes.  Fish from New York hatcheries are stocked in lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers throughout the state, supporting the state’s recreational sport fishery. » Continue Reading.