Posts Tagged ‘Turkeys’

Saturday, April 13, 2024

Birds go quiet, crocuses close during eclipse totality

Eclipse totality

I’m starting this column before the eclipse event this afternoon, April 8, as the skies are partly cloudy here and I hope it is clearer this afternoon. I’m going to try and take a few shots when it is total. My fifteen bird feeders are highly active, so I will see what happens when the darkness comes. I’ll also see how the birds react when the sun comes back out in a few minutes. We’ll see if they take a quick nap like it was nighttime or if they get back to feeding when the sun comes back out like they do at daylight in the morning.

Karen went into town to get the mail and she said it was almost like the Fourth of July. Tom Payne of Payne’s Air Service has been flying almost all day as many of our new visitors have never had a seaplane ride over the Adirondacks. I heard a helicopter flying over earlier this morning going somewhere to the north of us.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 6, 2024

Urging eclipse travelers to respect the Park, refrain from littering

Jake turkeys strutting

Well, the eclipse is coming Monday, April 8, but don’t put all your eggs in one basket as it may be cloudy or even raining…hate to dampen your parade, but it could happen. Looking at the weather prediction for that day, it looks good on the computer, but you never know. The area that I pick up litter along the highway has been mostly clear of snow for a couple weeks now, but I’m going to wait until after all these eclipse travelers are gone and only hope they take their litter with them.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 30, 2024

Songbirds compete with strutting turkeys at feeders

Falls at Bug Lake

Well, we finally had a week of winter (all at the same time) and even got the snowmobilers out and about until they wore it down to dirt on most of the trails. Many folks to the south of us in the Capital District got ice at the end of the snowstorm, which took down many powerlines, putting many out of power for a couple of days…and some longer. In most places, the temperature got into the single digits and didn’t get above freezing during daylight hours.

Ice was out of many lakes and with these cold temperatures along with the snow that cooled down the surface water temperatures, they all refroze. As of today, March 26, most are still covered with ice and the only open water is in the Moose River and the channel in Inlet where lots of waterfowl moved to find food. I had a Belted Kingfisher over my frozen pond just before the storm, and he wasn’t going to catch any fish there. I did find some Mallards in the beaver ponds on the outlet of Eighth Lake.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 24, 2024

Great Backyard Bird Count: Turkeys, chickadees, blue jays & more

Blue Jay in the Potter Trap. Photo by Gary Lee.

Well, we finally had a whole week of winter at one time with [morning] temperatures in single digits (even below zero a couple of days) and snow four days in a row. That kept the snowmobilers riding through the weekend, but trails hit by the sun are bare again with all that traffic. There were a few accidents, four went in the open water of the Inlet channel and one snowmobiler hit a pressure crack on Indian Lake. A rescue vehicle going to that accident went through the ice, [they] self-rescued and got out. The injured snowmobiler was brought to shore and a waiting ambulance.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 17, 2024

Recent storm spurs memory of Chibougamau Lake fishing trip

Blue Jays sitting in a tree

We hit all kinds of weather and temperature changes going to Utica two times this week. Starting out in the dark on Friday, [Feb. 9] the temperature was near freezing with a misty rain that tried to freeze on the windshield, but as we went further south the skies nearly cleared and we even saw a sunrise in Utica. The clouds moved in during the day, but only a few short showers passed through and it was mostly clear on the way home.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 3, 2024

16,138 birds seen during 2024 Region 7 Waterfowl Count

Tufted ducks

We just had our sixth January thaw since winter began in December and the driveway is bare again. The turkeys were picking grit from it to break down the corn in their crops. There have been from nine to thirty-three [turkeys] here daily at the feeders which have been spooked by hikers or skiers on the trail out back a few times. There were twenty-three here this morning [Jan. 31] and after they went down the ski trail, they got into quite a squabble. Some of the males must have been showing dominance, and by the sounds coming from there…feathers were flying.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 27, 2024

Turkeys airborne in every direction & Amaryllis “light bulbs”

Banded Carolina Wren

Last Sunday [Jan. 14], the temperatures started off at a low of 17 [degrees] and went down daily every morning to a low of -8 [degrees] here this Sunday [Jan. 21.] [We had] some new snow nearly every morning (the most being five inches on Thursday.) This gave the skiers and snowmobilers something to play on (if they could stand the cold temperatures and wind.) There were a few accidents on the trails and highways. The most dramatic was a small car that passed a chip truck tractor trailer over near Blue Mountain. Before getting back in [the] lane, it was hit by the state plow truck. The car was cut in half as it hit the plow of the plow truck broadside. I heard the driver of the car only got a black eye from the accident…lucky guy. This was all caught on camera from the DOT plow truck.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 20, 2024

Army troop of turkeys in yard, 130 mallard ducks in Inlet channel

Tufted titmouse

Winter has arrived a couple of months late, and the snowmobilers and skiers finally have enough snow to play on. This last three inches of snow that came yesterday morning [Jan. 14] was the best snow we have had all winter (and [we had] no rain following it when it stopped.) I saw a few people skiing down the trail behind the house and heard many snowmobiles going up the road out front. Sitting in my chair upstairs, I can see their lights coming down Limekiln Road from near the top of the hill to the ski trail parking lot. I know when it snows, as I can see the lights of the town crew plowing the road in the dark and I can also see them as they are plowing out the parking lot right from my bedroom window.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 13, 2024

Juvenile loon frees itself from Old Forge Pond

Iced-in loon on Old Forge Pond

It is finally white outside, but with possible warmer weather [and] rain and snow coming this week, it may not last very long. Last Thursday night the temperature plummeted to near zero [degrees] with the stars and moon shining bright most of the night with no wind. All lakes in this area froze that night with a coating of ice. Not very thick, but they were mostly ice covered. [The ice is not thick] enough to walk on (and certainly not [thick] enough to snowmobile on.) Check any ice [thickness and conditions] before you travel on any iced-over, snow-covered lakes.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 23, 2023

A Christmas cactus, 23 turkeys, and a whole lotta rain

Blooming Christmas cactus.

Well, winter went away in a heartbeat as it poured all night last night and I battled running water all day today (December 18.) It had rained most of the night and I looked out at the pond just after breakfast and a wooden box was swirling around over the outlet of the pond. I quickly put on my boots and rushed down as water was running everywhere. As I went down, I saw that water was running out of the safety valve outlet ditch at full stream. I had only seen this once before when the outlet pipe got plugged.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 26, 2020

Gobble gobble: All about wild turkeys

wild turkey - maleHappy Thanksgiving. In honor of the holiday, I’ve plucked out some stories about wild turkeys from the Almanack archive.

Found in all 50 states and hunted in every state but Hawaii, American sportsmen and women harvest roughly 700,000 turkeys annually. That makes turkeys the most sought after gamebird on the continent, according to Richard Gast in this 2018 article.

In Wild Turkeys Were Once Rare, Ellen Rathbone wrote about her encounters with them. Wild turkeys are an Almanack favorite, and you can read more stories about them here.

In our sister site the Adirondack Explorer, a recent column from the Nov/Dec 2020 issue of the magazine is posted here.


Saturday, June 15, 2019

Wild Turkey Nests

turkey chicks Last June I was walking through our field when I flushed a wild turkey hen. She emerged from the raspberry patch just a few feet away from me. I parted the thorny canes to reveal a nest on the ground lined with dried grass and containing nine large, creamy eggs, speckled with brown.

Since we were planning to have the field mown to control invasive wild chervil, I set stakes topped with orange flagging near the nest. The man we had hired to mow was a turkey hunter, and he was happy to give the nest a wide berth. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Man Barred From Owning Guns Ticketed for Poaching Turkeys

Facebook post showing the turkeys shot in a single dayDepartment of Environmental Conservation Environmental Conservation Officer Maxwell Nicols reported that on the evening of April 25, he received a tip about a Facebook post showing multiple turkeys killed prior to the season opener with a subject claiming to have harvested the birds during the youth hunt weekend. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 18, 2018

Wild Turkeys Facing An Uncertain Future

wild turkey - maleThe wild turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, is one of only two domesticated birds native to North America. The Muscovy duck is the other. Five sub-species make up the entire North American population. The most abundant is the eastern wild turkey, sub-species silvestris, meaning forest, which ranges across the entire eastern half of the United States and parts of eastern Canada. They’re readily identified by their brown-tipped tail feathers, which spread into a fan when the birds are courting or alarmed and by the bold black and white bar pattern displayed on their wing feathers. This is the same turkey variety encountered by the Pilgrims. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Participants Sought For Summer Wild Turkey Survey

Wild turkey hen with poults New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is encouraging New Yorkers to participate in a survey for wild turkeys and help state biologists better understand this iconic bird.

Since 1996, DEC has conducted the Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey to estimate the number of wild turkey poults (young turkey born this year) per hen statewide. Weather, predation, and habitat conditions during the breeding and brood-rearing seasons can all significantly impact nest success, hen survival, and poult survival. This index helps DEC to gauge reproductive success and predict the number of turkeys killed during the hunting season. » Continue Reading.



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox