Posts Tagged ‘Upper Jay’

Thursday, February 27, 2014

New Leadership at the Ausable River Association

ausable river watershedExecutive Director Corrie Miller, who led the Ausable River Association (AsRA) through the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene and has overseen the organization’s operations over the past two years, has announced her departure. Miller has accepted the position of Executive Director of Friends of the Mad River in central Vermont.

Replacing Miller as executive director is Kelley Tucker, long-time member of the AsRA board and co-author of the draft Ausable River Watershed Management Plan that is being prepared for public comment this year. “We took stock as a board and carefully reviewed our organizational needs, those of the community, and the watershed, and we decided we have the right person within our own ranks,” AsRA Board Chair Larry Master state in a statement to the press. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 3, 2014

Charles Shaw, Ace Attorney From Jay (Part 2)

CPShaw 02 BookletDespite all his accomplishments, Charles Shaw’s career is largely defined by a decade-long battle he fought on behalf of the cable interests for rail control of New York City’s streets. Cable’s two main rivals: horse-powered rail and underground lines. Both had many powerful backers.

Initially, Charles was hired to perform one task: lobby the state legislature for specific modifications of a bill under consideration in Albany. After earning the modern equivalent of more than a quarter million dollars for his efforts, Shaw was retained by the cable men, who wanted San Francisco-type cars operating on 70 miles of New York City roads.

Charles became the leading voice for cable, and was often vilified for his intense lobbying efforts. He refused to give up, at one point leading a four-man legal team against a cadre of 38 lawyers. The New York Times and other newspapers saw Shaw’s plan as nothing more than a city land-grab. But still he fought on, winning some victories and eventually spending over a million dollars in the effort. How high were the stakes? It was estimated that lobbyists representing cable had coughed up close to $5 million … and had still come up empty so far. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 27, 2014

Charles Shaw: Ace Attorney from Jay

CPShaw 01Among those to rise from humble Adirondack roots and pursue life in the big city was Charles P. Shaw, a native of Jay, New York, where he was born in 1836. “Humble,” meaning relative poverty, aptly described most North Country citizens in those early days. But Shaw may have had an advantage since there were two doctors in the family: his father, Daniel, and his grandfather, Joshua Bartlett. As educated men, they were more likely to stress among their family the importance of education.

For whatever reason, Charles was an excellent and precocious student. There survives in old newspapers an anecdote suggesting he was indeed an unusually bright pupil. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Video: The Recovery Lounge in Upper Jay

recovery_loungeMeet brothers Scott and Byron Renderer, owners and operators of Upper Jay Upholstery and The Recovery Lounge in Upper Jay. Together they created a unique space with which to share their passion for music, theater, and visual art.

My friend and colleague Sophie Blackburn and I recently visited The Recovery Lounge. Not only did we get a sense of the unique atmosphere the historic building provides, we also got to see a spectacular evening concert. Renowned roots, blues, and soul singer Alexis P. Suter and her band electrified the packed house of attendees, many of whom traveled some distance to descend on this hidden gem of a venue in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 22, 2013

5 Local Nominations Made For State, National Registers

100_1103The New York State Board for Historic Preservation recommended the addition of 27 properties and districts to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, including five in Northern New York.

Listing these properties on the State and National Registers can assist their owners in revitalizing the structures, making them eligible for various public preservation programs and services, such as matching state grants and state and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Project to Record Keene and Jay Memories of Irene

Burlington College students, under the direction of their instructor, Adirondack Almanack editor John Warren, will conduct Oral History interviews to record the Tropical Storm Irene stories of Jay and Keene residents on Saturday, December 3rd, at the Keene Community Center, (8 Church Street, in Keene), between 10 and 4 pm. The public is invited to share their stories; the resulting oral histories will be added to the collections of the Adirondack Museum.

Participants can schedule a time on December 3, or walk-in anytime between 10 am and 4 pm. It will only be necessary to spend about 15-20 mins at the Community Center where participants will be asked a number of questions about their experiences with Irene and will be provided an opportunity to tell the stories they think are important to remember about the events of this past late-summer.

To schedule your participation contact John Warren via e-mail at jnwarrenjr@gmail.com or call (518) 956-3830. The public is invited. Walk-ins are welcome.


Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Phil Brown: Quantifying Irene

How much rain fell during Tropical Storm Irene? Seems like an easy question, but it’s not.

The National Weather Service relies on volunteers to collect rainfall, and given the variance in rainfall and the finite number of volunteers, there are bound to be gaps in the data record.

For the current issue of the Adirondack Explorer, Nancy Bernstein created a rainfall map based on the Weather Service’s own maps. It shows that more than seven inches of rain fell in Keene, Jay, and Au Sable Forks. But how much more? The Explorer’s publisher, Tom Woodman, measured eleven inches at his home in Keene. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 8, 2011

Ausable River Restoration Walk and Talk

Carl Schwartz, US Fish and Wildlife Service and John Braico, NYS Trout Unlimited will lead a walk of the Ausable River on October 24 focused on rebuilding and repairing streams effected by flooding. Funds recently secured by the Ausable River Association (AsRA) for restoring tributaries damaged during Irene flooding are being considered for allocation.

Both Schwartz and Braico have worked extensively throughout New York to repair rivers and restore aquatic habitat. Schwartz works actively on river restoration projects and operates an excavator to build natural channels.

The Ausable River Association and the Essex County Soil and Water Conservation District are inviting and encouraging Citizens, Town Council members, Town DPWs, County DPW, DOT, DEC, and NonGovernmental Organizations to attend.

Date: October 24, 10 AM; Meet at the mouth of John’s Brook at the Rt. 73 bridge in Keene Valley; 2 PM Meet at the Gazebo in Ausable Forks.

For more information, contact the Ausable River Association.


Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Alan Wechsler: Jay Mountain Wilderness

Jay Mountain is surrounded by ominous signs.

To the east is Death Mountain. South of that is Slip Mountain. North of that is Bluff Mountain. So slip off bluff and find death.

Furthermore, without any official trail, and off any main road, these peaks are far off the radar. But after a visit last weekend — free of slips or deaths — I am proud to report that the Jay Mountain Wilderness is not only a lot more user-friendly than one might assume from its blank space on the map, but also that it’s well worth the visit.

To reach the trailhead — yes, there is one, though it’s unmarked — we drove through Keene Valley, passing hundreds of cars. Hikers were here by the flockload, it seemed, eager to take advantage of a sunny Saturday during fall color peak. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 8, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene:Josephine Foster and a Rock & Roll Benefit for ARC

So, I’ve been checking out Josephine Foster and Rachel Mason because this Saturday night concert seems the place to be this weekend. Both women have haunting voices and extremely different styles. I’m very curious and The Recovery Lounge is a great place to see a show. I’d also like to acknowledge Victor Herrero who was going to open for Ms. Foster. He had to cancel but he is quite the accomplished spanish guitar player and hopefully, he’ll be able to join the tour soon.

Thursday, April 8th:

In Canton, Open Mic Night at The Blackbird Cafe runs from 7 – 9 pm. Sign up earlier for a 3 song set.

Friday, April 9th:

In Canton, Friday Night Music Jam at the Tauny Gallery. This jam runs from 7 -8:30 pm.

Saturday, April 10th:

In Upper Jay, Josephine Foster will perform and Rachel Mason will open for her at The Recovery Lounge. The music starts at 8 pm and they will be passing a hat. Call 946-8315 for reservations.

In Plattsburgh, I Love Rock and Roll Benefit for ARC starts at 5:30 pm. The band is called Legend. $40 includes dinner at the West Side Ballroom.
Call (518) 563 – 0930 or (518) 834 – 5439 for reservation which are required.

Wednesday, April 14th:

In North Creek, Diz is performing at barVino starting at 7 pm.

Photo: Josephine Foster


Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Adirondack Bracket 2010: The Round of Sixteen (UPDATE)

Adirondack Bracket fans, welcome to the Benzene-Toluene-Ephedrine-Iodine-Phenylpropanolamine-Crystal methamphetamine-Sweet-Sixteen. The field is narrowing and the narrative is coming into focus. Chris Kowanko, the Renderer bros. and the whole crowd at Upper Jay Upholstery and Furniture —home to the Recovery Lounge—got the stuffing knocked out of them by a handful of bad mushrooms. They could have benefitted from a class in basic mycology. The mushrooms now face pond hockey, which put those cougar sightings on ice, and is said to be making a real comeback (beats waiting for the peewees to clear out of the rink).

The town of Black Brook, coached by Howard Aubin and LeRoy Douglas, displayed their unique style of environmental sensitivity with a proper burial of Jenks swamp, the state-protected wetland bisected by the Adirondack Northway, that nobody in their right mind would have built on anyway. Their pep squad of attorneys chanted from the sidelines, “make a federal case out of it!”

UPDATE: Black Brook now faces an equally potent wetlands menace in Triclopyr. This APA-sanctioned herbicide will be applied to Eurasian watermilfoil beds in Lake Luzerne. The public has been assured that this chemical will not harm grasses in areas where the lake water is used for irrigation. Studies have yet to be conducted, however, on its effect on municipal commitment to preventing invasive species from entering our lakes in the first place. One thing is for certain, however, in the Adirondack Bracket, it proved toxic to frankenpines. Strong stuff.

The lower left regionals witnessed an upset in the contest between birders and—the latest salvation of struggling hamlet economies and declining school populations—broadband. The unexpected outcome of this mismatch between fast and powerful telecommunications and what by any measure must be considered a rag-tag (though incredibly patient) bunch, turned on a simple miscommunication. The birders turned out in vast numbers, flocking to the Bloomingdale Bog, expecting to catch a rare glimpse of the broadbanded boobyhatch. Their tweets alone crashed the fledgling broadband network.

Birdiers go on to face the very ostrich-like John Brown. The martyr of Harper’s Ferry, perhaps boosted by a New York Senate reprieve on the possible closure of his Historic State Park, took 2009 Final Four contender Northville-Placid Trail in stride on his way home to the Plains of Abraham.

The second match-up in this region features the enduring pate-fluff of the Adirondack high peaks, Krumholtz and Cairns (not to be confused with the legal firm, Crumhorn and Korn) who were just too much for some of this area’s art centers to surmount.

They will face the legendary Yellow-Yellow, vanquisher of bear-proof canisters, and most recently of Moriah Shock and Lyon Mountain correctional facilities. In fairness to Moriah Shock and Lyon Mountain, they were both put on New York State Senate’s endangered species list before being devoured.


Thursday, January 21, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene: Haitian Benefit and Ski Jam

January happily brings out some annual weekly events – namely the Dewey Mountain Ski Jam and the January Jams in Upper Jay. Both the lodge and lounge are cozy feeling venues to encourage getting out and listening to a variety of musicians from the Adirondacks.

Also the Tri-Lakes High Five For Haiti Benefit Show will be held on Saturday. Numerous local musicians will be coming out to lend a hand. What better way to celebrate the weekend than listening to some of the best music The Adirondacks has to offer and helping out our World Community at the same time.

Friday, January 22nd:

In Saranac Lake , the Dewey Mountain Ski Jam is from 6:30 to 9:30 pm. This time it’s Big Slyde providing the tunes and Lake View Deli , the vittles. You can bring your own or rent skis and no one thinks less of you if you just want to enjoy the music. Donations are appreciated.

Saturday, January 23rd:

In Saranac Lake, a Haitian Benefit at The Waterhole’s Upstairs Music Lounge starts early at 5 pm with Haitian cocktails being featured during cocktail hour. Then at 6 pm, Just Jills start the music off. Other musical guests include; Heidi Little, The Pine Ridge Rounders , and Big Slyde.
All donations from the door go to Haiti.

In North Creek, Dreaded Wheat is playing at Laura’s Tavern. The show starts at 9 pm.

In North Creek, a Classical Piano Conert will be given by Eugene Albulescu at The Tannery Pond Community Center. The concert starts at 7:30 and goes until 9:30 pm.

Sunday, January 24th:

In Upper Jay, “January Jams” have started at The Recovery Lounge. The jam runs from 2 to 6 pm. This is a jam for any level of player. Audience members are also encouraged and it’s free.

Photo: Sarah Curtis and Theresa Hartford of Just Jills
Photo by: Jean-Charles Lehuby


Thursday, October 15, 2009

Adirondack Music Scene:Hip Hop, Blues, Modern Folk and Opera

We have a few interesting shows to choose from this weekend in the Adirondacks. I’m excited to check out Bruce Hayes in Upper Jay on Friday. His energy is so infectious I could feel it through the internet. The other event I think will be fascinating to check out is the Met Live in HD in Potsdam on Sunday. If the weather stays as it has, a few hours listening to amazing music in a movie theater sounds cozy.

Thursday October 15:

In Lake Placid at LPCA, Ball In The House is in concert at 7:30 pm. There are five singers in this vocals only band. Their studio album is tight as tight can get. You can check out the song “Trust Me” here. Students are $10 and adults $14.

Friday October 16:

In Upper Jay at The Recovery Lounge, Bruce Hayes starts at 8 pm. I listened to what I could of his music online and I really enjoyed it. An accomplished mandolin, acoustic and steel guitar player, he also has a wonderful voice. I love that he lists Jimi Hendrix and Lyle Lovett as influences.

Saturday October 17:.

In Saranac Lake Saranac Village at Will Rogers, in conjunction with Lazar Bear Productions, presents Tao Rodriguez-Seeger in concert at 7:30 pm. Pete Seeger’s grandson enjoys taking old time songs and giving them a modern twist. It’s interesting to hear electronic sounds mixed with a classic like “Sally Gooden”, which you can hear if you check out the above link. Tickets are $15 in advance and $18 at the door.

Later in Saranac Lake at the Waterhole, The Tim Heron Band starts at 10 pm. The doors open at 9 pm for cocktail hour. Brandon Devito features a special cocktail during this pre-show hour to get you in the dancing mood.

Sunday October 18:

In Potsdam at the Roxy Theater the Metropolitan Opera Live in HD is offering an encore showing of Puccini’s “Tosca” at 1 pm. The story consists of an opera star, a free-thinking painter and a sadistic police chief—just your typical love triangle . . .
Click here for tickets.

Wednesday October 21:

In North Creek at barVino, The Tony Jenkins Jazz Trip will be playing from 8 – 10 pm.

Photo: Bruce Hayes


Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Restoring Arto Monaco’s Land of Makebelieve

Among theme-park historians Arto Monaco is a legend. The work of Monaco in designing the area’s theme parks has become a central part of the history of tourism in the Adirondacks. His creations have been found in the defunct Old McDonald’s Farm (Lake Placid), The Land of Makebelieve (Upper Jay), Gaslight Village (Pottersville and then Lake George), and Frontier Town (North Hudson), at Storytown (now the corporate Great Escape) and Santa’s Workshop in Wilmington (the last of a breed and a spot that made our Seven Human-Made Wonders of the Adirondacks).

Monaco was a local artist who designed sets for MGM and Warner Brothers, a fake German village in the Arizona desert to train World War II soldiers, and later his own Land of Makebelieve. Monaco died in 2005, but not before the Arto Monaco Historical Society (AMHS) was organized (in 2004) in order to preserve and perpetuate Monaco’s legacy, assemble a collection of his work, and stabilize and restore the Land of Makebelieve which was closed in 1979 after the Ausable River flooded the park for the eleventh time.

Since they first went into the woods with tools in 2006, volunteers of the AMHS have hacked the now overgrown Land of Makebelieve out of the encroaching forests in hopes of saving what’s left of Monaco’s legacy there from the ravages of nature.

On Saturday, September 26, the AMHS will hold its 2009 Annual Meeting followed by a another work session at the former Land of Makebelieve site from 1 to 4 pm. The morning meeting will be held at Paul Johnson’s Bakery, on Route 9N one mile south of the Upper Jay bridge. Lunch is available for those who stay for the afternoon work session. To RSVP, or for information on the upcoming work day or volunteering for the AMHS in general, contact them through their website at http://www.artomonaco.org/.

Photo: The Land of Makebelieve in 2006 before volunteers began work on the abandoned theme park.


Thursday, June 11, 2009

ADK Music Scene: Rich Ortiz, Colin DeHond, Pulse Prophets

Tonight in Lake George: Rich Ortiz is at Christie’s On The Lake. I heard a bit online and he sounds like he’s a very good guitarist whose lyrics come from the heart. He’s popular in southern Warren County.

On Friday at Maxfields, 15 Market St, Potsdam, (315) 265-3796, the band Thanks but No Thanks is starting between 9 and 10 pm. A four-piece rock and roll band, they perform a collection of material from the 70s until present day. I’m a huge fan of the bass player Colin DeHond – his other gig is as a Long Hare in the Dust Bunnies. If you miss Thanks but No Thanks Friday you can catch them Saturday at La Casbah, also in Potsdam starting, at 9 pm. Both venues offer dinner menus.

It’s a jam-packed Saturday with a bunch of very good things to choose from in one night:

In Edwards at The Edwards Opera House, the duo Paul And Storm perform their original comedy songs starting at 7 pm.

In Saranac Lake at BluSeed there is going to be a songwriter’s concert starting at 7:30 pm. Mother Banjo is the headliner with a minimalist style and haunting voice she’s bound to please. Sharing the stage with her are local musicians The Dust Bunnies, Teresa Hartford and Sarah Curtis. It’s looking to be a round-robin concert where all the musicians take turns sharing songs and probably includes some discussion about what was going on at the time they were written.

In Upper Jay at the Recovery Lounge Big Slyde (Formally Slyde) will be playing from 8 to 10 pm. Hannah is back for the summer along with her beautiful voice and bouzuki – you know they are going to sound fabulous. Big Slyde gets into such good grooves it’s easy to move when listening to them. I’d be there if I wasn’t otherwise engaged!

Late night, Saranac Lake at the Waterhole. The Pulse Prophets will rock and reggae you in to the night starting at 9 pm.

On Sunday in Tupper Lake at P2’s, they are continuing their Super Sunday Music Series with Steve Signall from 7- 9 pm. Steve is an excellent mandolin player and singer, and he often brings talented friends along with him.

Photo: Pulse Prophets



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox