Posts Tagged ‘Wal-Mart’

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Hacketts Puts Lake Placid Store on Hold

Friday’s Watertown Times reports that the plans to create a department store in Lake Placid have been put on hold.

Seaway Valley Capital Corp. of Gouverneur, owner of Hacketts Department Stores, has temporarily suspended its plans to establish a new outlet at the Cold Brook Plaza in the space formerly occupied by Tops Supermarket. The loss of a $5 million line of credit from Wells Fargo Bank was cited by Seaway Valley Capital officials as the cause of the suspension.

Since September of last year, Hacketts arrival has been the subject of much anticipation in a region that lost its last large department store in 2002, when Ames closed in neighboring Saranac Lake. Efforts by WalMart Corporation to establish a store in the Town of North Elba (which contains the Village of Lake Placid and a portion of Saranac Lake) were thwarted in 1996 and 2006. A group hoping to establish an independent community department store in the Village of Saranac Lake is approaching its third year of a capital campaign to raise $500,000 for the project.

Calls to Seaway Valley Capital to ascertain a new timeline for the Lake Placid site were not returned Friday. Hacketts also has a store in Tupper Lake.


Monday, September 22, 2008

OPINION: Corporate Giants Taking More Local Money

There is news this week that two corporate giants – Verizon and Wal-Mart – are suing their local host communities to reduce their taxes.

That’s Verizon, the second-largest US telecom firm, who reported profits of 1.9 billion dollars in July, 2008. And Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer, who reported profits of nearly 3.5 billion in August.

“The margin of profit is very high here,” Ticonderoga Town Supervisor Bob Dedrick told NCPR’s David Sommerstein. But that doesn’t matter to Wal-Mart, which has already been skipping out on their taxes in a “payment in lieu of taxes” agreement for the past ten years. They’re seeking an assessment that’s less then half of what it is now (about $30,000 less in town taxes). Ticonderoga has a population of about 5,500 – countless others shop in the store from the eastern Adirondacks.

By the way, Dedrick has been an outspoken supporter of the big box stores that have helped ruin local business in Ticonderoga – he once took a busload of local citizens to APA headquarters in Ray Brook to support the Ticonderoga Lowe’s. “We have had extreme support on this. APA, here we come,” he told local media at the time. Those will be famous last words – now he says “as far as corporate Wal-Mart; I’m pretty disgusted.” How about an apology to your neighbors Mr. Dedrick?

Over in Hebron, Washington County, Verizon’s four parcels are worth about $593,848 in fair market value, according to the town assessor. The company, however, wants that figure lowered by $246,000. That’s about $87,000 per parcel – quite a real estate bargain. “It doesn’t add up to a whole lot of money, but it’s a lot for a small town,” Hebron Supervisor Brian Campbell told the Post Star, ” “It’s just amazing. What an easy way out of paying taxes, if they can do it.”

We all know that these two companies have a virtual monopoly in their sectors in our region. Their profits are not limited to their hosts communities, but their costs do range far and wide: county services for underpaid employees, local emergency services, road and highway maintenance, and more. These are the costs we all pay.

Then consider last month’s U.S. Government Accountability Office’s study that found that the majority of U.S. corporations don’t pay federal income taxes: “The GAO’s study found that over 60 percent of U.S. corporations—with revenue totals of more than US $2.5 trillion—did not pay federal income taxes.” Of course the study didn’t mention which companies, and one wonders where Verizon and Wal-Mart stand on that account. According to media reports, “The GAO found that 25 percent of all large corporations did not owe federal taxes in 2005. A large corporation is defined as a company with more than $250 million in assets.”

Add to those costs the $700 Billion of the CURRENT round of corporate bailouts (roughly $4,000 per individual income tax filer) – and who knows what corporate gifts lie ahead.

So much for that $600 so called “stimulus check” that went out this year.


Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Adirondack Wal-Mart Moves On

An important regional blogger Adirondack Wal-Mart will be writing only occasionally until the retail giant returns for another attempt at turning the Adirondacks into a suburban strip mall. According to a recent post:

I’ve been lured over to The Writing on the Wal. Until Wal-Mart raises its ugly head in the area, I’ll probably be posting only occasionally. If you want to see how Wal-Mart pretends to sleep after a defeat, read this post. It’s a very persistent company.

The latest in Saranac Lake is the possibility of an Aldi Supermarket – but guess who won’t support it? That’s right, the big Wal-Mart supporters. Apparently it was more of a political issue for them as well and less of a matter of getting an affordable store in town. We still think a community co-op, something like Honest Weight down in Albany, is the best path for isolated communities to protect their economies and provide the goods we all need.

Thanks again Adirondack Wal-Mart for all the great posts and for keeping us informed in a far more in-depth way that any of our local newspapers could (or would).

Check out the Adirondack Almanack’s previous Wal-Mart posts.


Friday, October 13, 2006

APA Approves Ticonderoga Lowe’s

The APA has bent over once again to big business and approved the Ticonderoga Lowe’s out of character and proportion big box store and sign. According to the Adirondack Daily Enterprise, New York Legislators for the Adirondacks Theresa Sayward and Betty Little took the opportunity to pander to the local corporate boosters:

Still, state Sen. Betty Little, R-Queensbury, and Assemblywoman Teresa Sayward, R-Willsboro, have been critical of the APA’s handling of this case, saying it shouldn’thave jurisdiction over this project.

But several commissioners pointed out that Lowe’s could build a store less than 40 feet in height and away from the wetland, and it would have not fallen under APA jurisdiction. Lowe’s could have moved the building, “and the sign issue would have never been here today,” Whaley said. APA spokesman Keith McKeever said Wal-Mart, which is located next to the proposed Lowe’s site, built a store 39 feet in height and avoided the APA permitting process.

Lowe’s will be permitted to build a 245-square-foot illuminated sign 30 feet in height. The APA limitations for such signs are 15 square feet and 20 feet in height. The only limitation set on the Lowe’s sign at the meeting was that Lowe’s has to turn off the illumination when the store closes.

We’ve discussed Lowe’s and Ticonderoga and Essex County’s failures here before, but we’d like to point readers again to the Adirondack Wal-Mart Blog, a leader in regional big box development information. Recently, they took a trip to the Ticonderoga Wal-Mart, held a discussion of Ticonderoga’s plight, blogged on the Wal-Mart funded Citizens for Economic Opportunity, self-loathing in Saranac Lake, the Sound Adirondack Growth wiki-war, and the proposed Saranac Lake community store [more at Adirondack Musing on that].

The Lowe’s debacle is the latest effort by the anti-zoning unrstrained development folks, who found their latest voice is State Senate candidate Tim Merrick, who, according to NCPR ” is proposing to remove the permitting and enforcement authority of the Adirondack Park Agency.”

Check out what Brian had to say recently.


Friday, August 11, 2006

This Just In: Saranac Lake Wal-Mart Will Pull Out

The Adirondack Daily Enterprise is reporting that:

Wal-Mart’s bid to build a 121,000-square-foot Supercenter on three Lake Flower Avenue parcels is over, and the company has terminated purchasing agreements with the owners of Carcuzzi Car Care Center and Tri-Lakes Auto Mall, Wal-Mart spokesman Philip Serghini said Friday.

There’s more over at the Adirondack Wal-Mart Blog.

UPDATE 8/16/06: The Adirondack Wal-Mart Blog wonders “Has Wal-Mart Really Given Up?” and North Country Public Radio has a full report.


Wednesday, July 12, 2006

Ticonderoga Lowe’s – Another Lesson in Poor Planning

On the heals of the Saranac Lake WalMart debacle comes the latest planning ignorance from our elected officials. Lowe’s Home Improvement will be using their immense size along with lame and out of proportion architectural [ahem] design, to further erode downtown Ticonderoga. The Plattsburg Press Republican is reporting on the Lowe’s project. Lowe’s operates over 1,225 stores in 49 states (excepting Vermont) and is number 42 on the Fortune 500 list – it’s the second largest hardware chain in the country.

Ti could have a nice downtown, which although filled with numerous abandoned shops and empty lots, still has much of its Victorian character and walkability. Unfortunately local and regional planners are eager to abandon the downtown in favor of ugly, automobile access only, strip development about a mile away. So far a Wal-Mart SuperCenter, a Super 8 Motel, a McDonald’s, a Subway and a Dunkin’ Donuts have all located on what was once farmland at the edge of town. All these businesses could have located downtown. Think of it! Imagine the ability to shop at several stores within walking distance downtown, maybe stop at the Post Office, or for coffee at a local coffee shop, maybe at the library.

Instead, Lowe’s, along with Congressman John McHugh (R-Pierrepont Manor, Vietnam draft-dodger), Ticonderoga Town Supervisor Robert C. Dedrick, and a number of other small-minded corporatist want to see Lowe’s build a 53 feet high 124,000 square foot store with, and get this, a 245 square foot sign! The standard APA park sign size is 60 square feet and the building is already designed a full story above the park limit. Apparently Lowe’s thinks that the Adirondack Park is just like any other place on earth.

Dedrick said a 60-square-foot sign was put up as a test at the proposed Lowe’s site.

“You could barely see the sign. You certainly couldn’t read the letters.”

Ah… yeah… sure Dedrick, maybe that’s because most reasonable people believe that a building and its sign shouldn’t be designed as an eyesore on purpose and that a 53 by what 2 or 3 hundred foot building is visible enough – especially when it’s designed to be entirely incongruent with its surroundings.

Dedrick said a busload of Ticonderoga citizens will be going to APA headquarters in Ray Brook for the meeting when the vote will be taken.

“We have had extreme support on this. APA, here we come.”

Supervisor Joyce Morency (R-St. Armand) said that as many members of the Essex County Board of Supervisors as possible should also attend.

Folks, take the time to counter these fools and save Ticonderoga from their lengthy tenure at destroying one of America‘s most important historic towns.

Vote them out!

Attend the public hearing on the sign variance on either July 17 or 24 at the Ticonderoga Armory Community Building (now that’s some nice scheduling work from the local officials).

UPDATE 7/13: The Press Republican accurately describes the current situation in an editorial July 11:

Ticonderoga Supervisor Robert Dedrick says the APA has assured him the process will be conducted fairly and without bias.

At this stage, that appears unlikely, for it will be difficult for the agency to rule against Lowe’s now, no matter how much sense it might make to do so. If the agency decides the store must settle for the 60 square foot sign, the charges of obstinacy and absence of fairness will fly in earnest. It will take more guts than normal to rule against the company.

In government, appearance is often more important than reality. In this case, it appears the APA has been backed into a ruling it will be hard pressed to deny.

The simple fact remains – the size of their store is a more than big enough sign. By trying to muscle the agency whose job it is to defend the character of the Adirondacks they prove themselves to be the enemy of the New York Constitution and the people its represents.

UPDATE 7/20: The Adirondack Park Agency issued a permit approving construction of a 153,000 square foot Lowe’s including a 124,051-square foot building and attached 28,829-square foot garden center, a parking lot for 441 vehicles, signage, lighting and landscaping. Municipal water supply, wastewater treatment and stormwater facilities will serve the Lowe’s Store. Once the permit is recorded in the Essex County Clerk’s Office, the developer is free to begin construction. The permit includes a condition that sign for the proposed store must conform to the size and height limitations required by the Agency’s “Standards for Signs Associated with Projects.” Agency regulations limit signs on jurisdictional projects to 40 square feet (15 square feet for luminous signs) and limit the total sign area of two signs on a project site to 60 square feet.

UPDATE 7/26: A well-organized group of ill-informed locals gave the APA a hard time at the hearing over the sign. Here’s a nice tidbit:

Moriah Town Supervisor Thomas Scozzafava is a longtime foe of the APA.

“We have suffered economic hardship in the Adirondack Park since the creation of the Adirondack Park Agency. We have been forced to live like second-class citizens.”

Sure Scozzafava – you live like a second class citizen.


Monday, May 8, 2006

Some Posts From Around the Adirondack Region You May Not Have Seen

Over at jockeystreet we have a great post on the meaning of May 1st – that’s the original May 1st, not the jingoistic 1958 Cold War version that is dying a slow and deserving death in Glens Falls – apparently much to the dismay of the Glens Falls Post Star.

Speaking of the region’s worst daily – and we recently spoke with a long time VIP at the paper who completely agreed with that assessment. We wish we could say more about that but he asked us not to. Anyway, Matt is back with his Angry (and strikingly disturbing and truthy) Letters to the Editor which demonstrate the long held accusations of Matt’s. Apparently they are withholding and corrupting the news, printing painfully slanted rhetoric in place of the news, and, well, lying to their readers.

A nice comparison is to take a look at these two stories:

From the Post Star: DEC wins court decision stopping vehicle use on Adirondack roads (now that’s a headline – how the hell will we get to the grocery? or the pub?)

And from the North Country Gazette (now a one woman about to go under webzine): Horicon Loses Attempt to Lift ATV Ban

In other internet news – we have a bizarre thread on the need to carry guns while hiking. Forget the bears! Its the teenagers some are ready to shoot.

And there’s the local Wikipedia war with words!

While we’re going on about the new wonders of the internet – Metroland has a good read about the death of local music retailer The Music Shack – unfortunately the blame is all on us, has nothing to do with them:

For every music collector, record collector, appreciator of album covers and lover of lyric sheets, there is a careless bandit, an unemotional music drone, the one who downloads music willy-nilly, regardless of taste, ignoring the band’s history or influences, oblivious to the group’s importance and pedigree or lack thereof. These buyers are the ones who are giving Memorex, Dynex and Verbatim a boost in the piggy bank. They are the ones you see scooping the jumbo CD carrying cases off the shelves at Wal-Mart to fill with ugly, scribbled-on discs. They are the people who don’t recognize the album covers or know the track names of their favorite bands.

Metal fans are in a tizzy – where will they buy the latest Tool? Meanwhile, music is making real progress on an old front – connecting with the dramatic and awful things that are happening today. We give you:

The release of Bruce Springsteen’s cover of Pete Seeger tunes from Hudson Mohawk IMC
The release of Neil Young’s Living With War (with extra mp3 goodness for all you “unemotional music drones”) from Vermont’s False 45th Blog.

UPDATE #1 – 05/10/06: NCPR reports on calls to restrict ATV use by young children.

UPDATE #2 – O5/10/06: Forgot to mention a really great music blog agregator with plenty of great mp3 goodness – elbo.ws


Thursday, February 9, 2006

Another Wal-Mart On The Way – To Saranac Lake in the Adirondacks

The rumors were persistent, probably a sign that the deal was already done behind closed doors. Wal-Mart is coming to Saranac Lake and it’s going to be a big Supercenter: 121,000 square feet. “The Wal-Mart Supercenter would be considerably larger than the building Ames used to occupy ­– larger even than the entire plaza in which the building sits,” reports the Plattsburgh Press Republican:

In a news release, Philip Serghini, the retail giant’s public affairs manager, said, “Wal-Mart very much wants to become part of the Saranac Lake community so that consumers in the area can benefit from everyday low prices.

“We hope to design a store that is in keeping with this unique community.”

Whether Saranac Lake is as eager for Wal-Mart to join the community depends on who you ask.

Some cheered the news Wednesday evening, saying the arrival of Wal-Mart would finally bring to Saranac the kind of low-cost retail store it has been without for too long.

Others fretted, saying it could cripple local businesses and, in doing so, ruin the character of the community.

Saranac Lake and Lake Placid have both fended off Wal-Mart in the past. The nearest Wal-Mart stores are in Plattsburgh and Ticonderoga.

There will be a fight:

Mayor Tom Catillaz learned of Wal-Mart’s announcement from a reporter [a-hem… sure he did]. He, too, balked at the size.

“I really need to wait to see what their plans are,” he said. “Hopefully they’ve got plans for a smaller store.”

Mark Kurtz, whose Sound Adirondack Growth Alliance has kept a close eye on the issue, said the organization would have to learn more about the proposal before issuing a strong opinion.

Oddly enough, Carcuzzi car-repair co-owner Bob Bevilacqua (an owner of land that Wal-Mart is looking at) actually believes that “having a Supercenter here will keep tax dollars in the community.”

Who exactly is he kidding, beside himself? Apparently he’s done NO research on the costs of these Supercenters – goodbye local business, hello low wage jobs supplied with benefits from county services, hello New Jersey like development, goodbye tourism.

Good luck Saranac Lake – some resources are here.

UPDATE: An anonymous reader points us to a new blog: Adirondack Wal-Mart. A recent excerpt:

Does Saranac Lake need a large retailer? Sure it does. Do we need 121,000 sq ft of stuff for sale? Well it seems that could be a point of compromise. Would a downtown location for a retailer be a better option? Certainly a question deserving of an answer. Can the people of Saranac Lake, it’s towns and counties work together to find the answers? One would hope so.


Wednesday, November 23, 2005

Wal-Mart Inside The Adirondack Blue Line?

The great debate is on. Will Walmart be welcome if they come to Saranac Lake? The Adirondack Daily Enterprise is offering a chance to vote and the opposition has the advantage (so far). Adirondack Musing has put a couple of the key arguments up today. The Adirondack Live Journal also has a discussion going.

Balogh Blog has a nice rundown of the reasons why Wal-Mart sucks and CNY ecoBlog has recently put together some links to various reviews and pages related to the new movie. Screening locations are listed here.

As for Adirondack Almanack – you know where we stand on the big box.

The question is, just what is it in the water at Saranac Lake that brings out all this?


Monday, July 18, 2005

Local Blogger Round-Up

Local blogs are proliferating. We’ve often cheered the writings of the Fairly Young Contrarian, whose recent rant against WAMC echoes our own feelings that Northeast Public Radio has gone too far – it’s time we had our own station that’s a little more local than Albany, or even Canton, for that matter.

A (rightfully) angry Jim Kunstler is back this week with another installment of Clusterfuck Nation “the industrial nations of the world will soon be competing desperately, perhaps even fighting over, the world’s remaining oil, while all our economies contract remorselessly” – whew… if only WAMC or NCPR would start seriously talking about that, and the implications for our region.

The Southern Adirondack DFA is busy missing the point (number 4) and encouraging us all to bypass Wal-Mart, not for local business, but for Costco… sure trade one super-national big box sprawl store for one that supports the perpetually losing corporate party DFA favors.

NYCO’s blog is Playing Chicken… something the DFA should think about when it supports corporations over people.

It’s certainly something Newsbreakers have been fired up over lately, even as their new blog calls it like it is.

And thanks to local bloggers Bethquick, CNY Ecoblog, and NYCO, who have (without us even asking!) added links to ADK Almanack… thanks folks



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