Posts Tagged ‘Warrensburgh Historical Society’

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Graveyard Walks Through Warrensburg History Planned

12066017_898903666861717_1774109501254190536_nSince 2001, the Warrensburgh Historical Society has been hosting annual Graveyard Walks. Through historical research, a narrator, actors, visitors and students have the opportunity to learn the connections between national events and local citizens. This year’s event is focusing on people who were killed or died during World War II.

According to Warrensburgh Historical Society President Paul Gilchrist, the October 21 and 28 Graveyard Walks will take place rain or shine, cold or wind. This year’s military theme focuses on five residents with a connection to the Second World War. The two-hour walks are led by a guide to each of the gravestones. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 25, 2016

Warrensburg Historical Society Plans Graveyard Walks, Dinner

2015 Graveyard WalkThis year’s Warrensburg Historical Society Graveyard Walks will be conducted at the Warrensburg Cemetery, 174 Hudson Street, on Friday, October 21, and Friday, October 28, at 7 pm.

Characters expected to surface at the cemetery this year brothers Ray and Eldon Haskell, who both lost their lives in World War Two. Vera Brown, suspected of being a spy; John Taylor, a Navy submariner; and Emily Martin, a nurse.

Both walks will be followed by free homemade desserts at the Miles Thomas House (Senior Center) on Main Street, which will be transformed into a U.S.O. for the evening. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Warrensburg-Glens Falls Trolley Program, Ceremony May 15

trolley carA program on the early 20th century trolley route from Warrensburg to Glens Falls will be presented at the Richards Library in Warrensburg on Sunday, May 15, at 3:30 by Paul Gilchrist, PhD.

Warrensburg was the northern terminus of the Hudson Valley Railway’s trolley line from 1902 until 1928. The presentation of photographs, maps, and aerial photos will follow a ceremony unveiling a roadside plaque marking the location of the Schroon River hydroelectric plant that supplied the trolley line » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 18, 2015

Historic Warrensburgh Walking Tours This Weekend

Warrensburg Historical Society BuildingOn Saturday and Sunday, June 20 and 21 the Warrensburgh Historical Society will be conducting a walking tour of the early residential and civic district of the village, led by architectural historian Delbert Chambers.  The tour will pass more than 30 historic properties and is one of four walking and two driving tours being developed by the Society’s Preservation Committee.

The one-mile tour will be held each day at 10 am starting at the Warrensburgh Museum of Local history, 3754 Main Street and will take approximately two hours, including a rest stop at the Miles Thomas House (currently Senior Citizen Building). Admission is free, but each tour will be limited to twenty people. Reservations must be made by calling Town Historian Sandi Parisi at 623-2207. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 24, 2014

‘My Collection’ Exhibit Coming to Warrensburgh Museum

Collectibles samplingLocal residents are asked to show off part of their own collections at the Warrensburgh Museum’s Holiday Exhibit, entitled “My Collection.” 

The exhibit, sponsored by the Warrensburgh Historical Society, will run from December 6 through January 14, 2015. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 30, 2014

New History Exhibit: Warrensburg Fire, EMS And Police

Firemen ParadeThe Warrensburgh Museum of Local History is preparing its major summer/fall 2014 exhibit, opening Sunday, June 29, at 1 PM with a reception, and will remain through Columbus Day.  The exhibit tells the stories of the Warrensburg Volunteer Fire Company, Warrensburg Emergency Medical Service, and local policing efforts, including the role Warrensburg citizens played as Warren County sheriffs.

Since Warrensburg’s early settlement in the late 18th century, as in any frontier community, the safety and protection of its settlers was a concern but little could be done about it.  Destructive fires, whether of home, barn or commercial building, were all too common.  With illnesses and accidents, availability and distances to doctors meant that home remedies were heavily relied upon.  And self-protection was the order of the day when it came to criminal activity. » Continue Reading.