Posts Tagged ‘westport library’

Sunday, January 14, 2024

Westport Library: Cellist Luiz Fernando Venturelli performs Jan. 17

 

Luiz Fernando Venturelli, Meadowmount School of music, cello player
The Westport Library is pleased to present the Meadowmount School of Music in Concert, featuring cellist Luiz Fernando Venturelli on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 at 6 p.m. The program will include works by: Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson, Dimitri Cervo, J. S. Bach, Marlos Nobre, Cesar Franck, and Azevedo/Abreu. Admission to the concert is free of charge, with a suggested $20 donation to support the Westport Library.

About the Artist: Luiz Fernando Venturelli is a Brazilian cellist who is rapidly gaining recognition as one of the most promising young musicians of the country. He received his bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University in 2021 and his master’s in 2023, studying under Professor Hans Jørgen Jensen. Born and raised in a musical family, Luiz began his musical studies at the age of 3 and began playing the cello when he was 8. He studied at the Instituto Baccarelli, a non-profit organization that offers free music lessons to children, from the time he was 8 until he came to the United States when he was 17.

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Saturday, November 18, 2023

Lecture on John Brown in Westport, Dec. 6

John Brown by Southworth Hawes 1856

When John Brown Came To Westport: American Abolitionism and American Slavery Before the Civil War
A lecture with American historian, Connor Williams

Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2023, 5:30 PM

 

“The past is a foreign country,” the novelist L.P. Hartley once wrote. “They do things differently there.”

Perhaps nothing about American history is more foreign to us today than our history as a slave society. Yet that is our national truth, and our original sin. By the 1861 outbreak of the Civil War, the United States was the world’s greatest slave power. For almost 250 years Americans and their ancestors had created, maintained, and spread systems of enslavement throughout much of our nation. Indeed, it will take another 88 years before the lands of the United States will have known freedom for longer than they have known enslavement. » Continue Reading.



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