Posts Tagged ‘wild edibles’

Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Foraging for Wild Food: Workshop series at Paul Smith’s VIC

pigweedI’ve always found the idea of foraging for wild edible plants appealing, but daunting. I know a little about wild plants and foraging, but I lack confidence. And with good reason. I didn’t grow up foraging and, although it’s possible to acquire knowledge about foraging from books and websites, it’s a lot easier (and safer) to learn from someone who has first-hand foraging knowledge and experience; someone who has been gathering, preparing, and eating wild foods throughout his or her entire life.

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Franklin County is offering a series of Wild Edibles Workshops during July and August.

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Saturday, May 29, 2021

MAKE IT: Wild Spring Greens Salad with Maple Balsamic Dressing

Wild Spring Greens Salad with Maple Balsamic Dressing

One of my favorite things to do in the springtime is to gather young wild greens for my salads. I love eating salads full of dandelion, common evening primrose, red clover, and chicory greens. When harvesting any of these greens, make sure to follow safe and ethical harvesting practices, and wash thoroughly with cold water prior to consuming. Enjoy!

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Saturday, May 8, 2021

Nettles: Not Just for Breakfast Any More

One of my favorite plants is either highly versatile, or confused. On one hand, professional herbivores like deer refuse to touch it, but many people, myself included, gladly eat it every day it’s available. While contacting it is painful, it has been proven to relieve certain chronic pain. It is steeped in over a thousand years of folklore, at one point imbued with the power to cleanse away sin, yet medical science recognizes it as a legitimate remedy for many disorders. Some gardeners consider it a bothersome weed, while others cultivate it.

The stinging nettle, Urtica dioica, is native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa but has been widespread throughout North America from northern Mexico to northern Canada for centuries. Experts disagree as to the number of species and subspecies worldwide, as nettles freely hybridize.

Nettles sprout little hypodermic needles on stems, leaves, and even flowers. Called trichomes, these glass-like, silica-based needles inject a mixture of irritating chemicals upon contact. The cocktail varies by species, but usually includes histamine, 5-HTP, serotonin, formic acid and acetylcholine.

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