Posts Tagged ‘winter’

Thursday, February 22, 2024

The Nuclear Snowball

snowball

An Adirondack Outlaw “winter fun” memory story.

Adirondack Outlaws are daunting snowball fight opponents. They’ve had years to hone their arms & their aim, are always prepared for a fight,  and show up locked, loaded & armed with all types of ammo.

 Sometimes even including lethal, TOP SECRET, game changing weapons like nuclear snowballs.    

To read the full story, click the link and read on: https://adirondackoutlaw.com/the-nuclear-snowball


Saturday, February 17, 2024

Discussion time: Winter pastimes

discussion graphic

As we’ve seen, this winter has been a letdown in the snow department. What favorite winter activities are you missing?

In happier news, Dick Monroe passed along this news that the toboggan chute in Lake Placid has reopened. He writes “We used to have a lot of fun there when I was a kid, lots of great memories of that toboggan run.”

So in that spirit, share your memories of winter fun from years past!


Thursday, December 28, 2023

From the Archives: Animals in Winter

Black bear mother and cub hibernating - University of Minnesota
The past few days have been a strange start to our Adirondack winter, with warm temperatures in the 40s and a drizzly rain.
But, don’t be deceived… winter is officially here! So, what happens to the wildlife in the ADKs when the temperatures drop and the snow starts to fall?

Check out some of these great articles from the Adirondack Almanack archives:

 

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 20, 2023

Wet, Dangerous Conditions in the Adirondacks and Catskills

Winter hiking

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today advised recreationists in the Adirondacks and Catskills of wet and dangerous conditions following recent mild temperatures and heavy rain.

The warmer weather and extensive rain melted much of the existing snowpack, swelling waterways and making water crossings dangerous with fast and strong currents. DEC advises visitors not to attempt stream crossings where bridges are not available. Water temperatures will be extremely cold and full or partial submersion can quickly lead to hypothermia. Waterways are not yet frozen and crossing of ponds or lakes should not be attempted. Avoid getting too close to stream and riverbanks as they may be icy.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, December 8, 2023

Poetry: Thundersnow

Birds at feeders

THUNDERSNOW

 

At the feeder,

cold and hungry,

birds of a different feather

flocked together,

creating a temporary

neighborhood of necessity.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 1, 2023

DEC: Consequences of Feeding Deer in Winter

Deer in winter

Now that white-tailed deer hunting seasons have ended throughout most of New York State, it may be tempting to begin feeding deer to “help” them through the winter. However, feeding deer during the winter or other times of the year is unnecessary, prohibited in New York, and can have very negative consequences for deer, your neighbors, and surrounding wildlife habitat.

During the winter, deer mainly rely on woody vegetation (known as woody browse) for their nutritional needs. The digestive enzymes in a deer’s stomach change in the winter to better digest this browse. If deer are provided with unnatural food sources such as corn or hay after this change in diet has occurred, it can result in deer becoming ill or even dying. Deer will eat the unnatural food source, but can develop acidosis (grain overload disease) or enterotoxemia (Clostridium overgrowth) disease because they can’t digest the food properly. Both diseases can result in the rapid illness and death of deer even though their stomachs are full.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 25, 2023

Be a ‘Snow Birder’ This Winter

Barred owl

While the chilliest months of the year may seem like the hardest time to venture outdoors, it can be a great time to go birding. Layer up and head out to your backyard, local park, or other public space and observe some of the bird species that you may not normally see during warmer months. Winter raptors (PDF)—including snowy owls (PDF)short-eared owls, barn owls, and hawks—migrate south from the Canadian tundra and can be observed near open bodies of water and large grasslands. Some species of woodpeckers may be easier to hear or see in their winter homes. Black-capped chickadees remain in northern climates due to their ability to survive the ultra-cold weather. Winter is also the best time to observe bald eagles!

Use a website like eBird to see what species have been detected near you. The free Merlin Bird ID app can help you identify unfamiliar birds and add even more new species to your lists.
If you do brave the cold and snow, properly preparing for winter conditions is essential for a more enjoyable and safe experience. Check out our YouTube video on layering for winter, and read up on some of our winter hiking safety tips that can be used for any outdoor trip.

Check out the New York State Birding Trail to find locations across the state to go birding.

Photo of barred owl by Fred McCagg. Photo courtesy of the NYS DEC.


Tuesday, January 24, 2023

The Beauty of a Snowflake 

Snowflakes

A snowflake is one of God’s most fragile creations. Psalm 147:16 begins, “He sends the snow like white wool” (NLT). And there really is something awesome about freshly fallen, white snow covering everything. It really is like a blanket of white wool spread over the earth. In fact, because snow is comprised of 90 to 95 percent trapped air, when it covers the ground, it keeps everything beneath it warm. That’s why so many animals tunnel into the snow to hibernate or burrow into the ground to get comfortable beneath the snow during winter. It’s also the reason that igloos can be so much warmer inside than outside.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 22, 2023

Singing Ice and Soup

ice

Up until last week, I had not realized just how much I missed the sound of singing ice.

When I was a child, my mom firmly believed in the value of sending kids outdoors to play, regardless of the conditions. Much like the United States Postal Service, no sleet, snow, rain, heat, gloom of night, or other varying atmospheric conditions would prompt our mom to waver from her mandate. If we were home and not completing indoor chores or homework, we were expected to be outdoors.

At the time, I did not exactly appreciate the benefits that fresh air and exercise – even when imposed on an unwilling recipient – could offer. However, I did appreciate the opportunity to hone such skills as tree/snow fort/shelter creation, fish acquisition (using a rod – somewhat successful; trying to catch them with my hands like I saw in the old Disney movies – not so much), campfire building/outdoor cooking (foreshadowing!), sledding (bonus points for missing trees and fences; extra bonus points for getting air or steering close to a sister and causing them to wipe out when going downhill), knot tying (successful in tying knots; unsuccessful in correctly tying specific knots that could also be untied), tree climbing, swimming (bonus points for not getting any leeches; extra bonus points if your sister did), ice skating, and more.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 29, 2022

A winter walk

Snow covered road

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 3, 2022

The end of winter?

The view from the roof of the "silo" science station on the summit of Whiteface on Sept. 21. Photo by Zachary Matson

In a new paper on how climate change is impacting the Adirondacks, Paul Smith’s College researchers waited until their last paragraph to raise a term that has stayed with me: the demise of winter.

It’s practically an aside in the paper’s concluding discussion.

“Today’s annual crossing and re-crossing of the thermal threshold between solid and liquid water has profound effects on cultures and ecosystems alike, and the eventual loss of that transition – i.e. the demise of winter – could produce the greatest climate-driven changes in the region,” they wrote.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 2, 2022

Heating With Wood This Winter 

I need to preface this article by assuring readers that, contrary to what many people are saying, New York State is not considering passing legislation that would prohibit burning wood or woody biomass products (pellets, scrap wood, sawmill and forest residues) at this time. There is a draft-plan, however, in which the state Climate Action Council’s advisory panel sets out scenarios for an 85% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, with overall wood use decreasing within that time frame.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 29, 2022

The last of winter?

winter weatherWhile I hope we are putting the winter weather behind us, a flash of snow last week that left thousands without power was a reminder of the damage that can be caused. It all depends on the kind of precipitation that actually hits the ground.

Enter atmospheric researchers from University at Albany and other institutions in both Canada and the U.S. The scientists recently completed a six-week field campaign where they collected an enormous amount of data on the mixed winter precipitation storms that often confound forecasters and commuters alike.

Using ground observations, soaring weather balloons, tank-like mobile radars and a specialized airplane to collect the data, the scientists hope to develop a better understanding of the fundamental dynamics of storms that sometimes end with freezing rain, sometimes with sleet and sometimes with a heavy snow in April that forces you to find a coffee shop to work from.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 22, 2022

When considering birds, winter is ideal time for forest management

white-throated sparrow

By Zack Boerman

While it’s common for forest management activities to be carried out year round, seasons are an important consideration when working with birds.

In the summer, for example, you’ll easily notice if your forest is well-shaded by a large mature canopy, resulting in bare ground underneath. In this scenario, birds that need shrubs and small trees growing on the forest floor, like Ruffed Grouse and Black-throated Blue Warbler, may be absent.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, January 14, 2022

DEC Advises Backcountry Visitors of Winter Conditions


winterOutdoor Adventurers Encouraged to Prepare for Snow, Ice, and Cold
Current snow and cold weather are providing good conditions for winter outdoor recreation in the Adirondacks, Catskills, and other backcountry areas. To ensure a safe and enjoyable winter experience, visitors are advised to plan ahead and prepare with proper clothing and equipment for snow, ice, and cold.

Snow depths range greatly throughout the Adirondacks, with the deepest snow at higher elevations in the High Peaks region and on mountains over 3,000 feet. Snow depths are thinner in the southeastern and northwestern Adirondacks. Ice is also present on high elevation trails, as well as many low-lying trails. Much of the Catskill Mountains are covered in snow, with icy trail conditions.

» Continue Reading.



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