Posts Tagged ‘winter’

Saturday, March 27, 2021

Time is Running Out to Practice Winter Tree ID Skills

tree identificationIt’s officially spring! Warmer weather, longer days, and green leaves are headed our way. That means there’s just a short window of time left to practice your winter tree identification skills in the forest!

Did you get a chance to tune into our walk in the woods with DEC foresters last month where they provided winter tree ID tips for common New York State species? If not, be sure to check it out on our Facebook page.

Photo: Foresters from DEC’s Division of Lands and Forests provided a tour of common New York State trees during a Facebook Live in February.

Editor’s note: For more about identifying trees in winter, read this recent post by Paul Hetzler.


Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Tree Buds: Honest Friends

winter treesHow to distinguish one leaf-bereft hardwood from another in winter is more of a challenge than summer tree ID, but there are practical reasons – and a few offbeat incentives – to tell one species from another in the dormant season. Hikers and skiers can benefit from such a skill, and in survival situations, hydration and warmth may depend on it. And if you’re among those who adore wintertime camping, you can have more fun when you know common woody species.

In late winter/ early spring, a pathogen-free beverage flows from sugar, silver, and red maples when temperatures rise above freezing in the day. A bit later in the spring yet prior to leaf-out, our native white (paper), yellow, black, grey, and river birches yield copious, healthful sap as well. The same can be said for wild grape stems, although it’s crucial that one can recognize other vines out there like Virginia creeper and poison ivy.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 28, 2021

Snow Jobs: The white stuff makes for good growing

Where agriculture is concerned, dairy is king (or is dairy queen?) in northern NY State. Looking out the window now in late February, though, it looks like we should be growing snow peas or iceberg lettuce. Actually, for farmers, maple producers, foresters and gardeners, there is an up-side to having plenty of winter white stuff.

Snow has been called “the poor person’s fertilizer” because it’s a source of trace elements and more importantly, of plant-available forms of nitrogen, a nutrient often in short supply. When snowmelt releases a whole winter’s worth (i.e., almost six months) of nutrients in a short time, the nitrogen value can add up.

Since air is 78% nitrogen, you’d think plants would have all they needed. But atmospheric nitrogen, N2, is a very stable, inert molecule that plants are unable to use – you might say that for plants, nitrogen gas is broken. Fortunately, some soil bacteria can “fix” gaseous nitrogen, converting it to water-soluble forms that plants can slurp up. Lightning also turns nitrogen gas into plant “food.” But this only accounts for a small percentage of the nitrogen found in snow.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, February 12, 2021

DEC winter recreation tips: Food and water storage

thermosWinter recreation is fun and exciting. It can also be challenging and dangerous. Whether you’re going for a hike, a ski, snowmobiling or ice fishing, Hike Smart NY can help you prepare with a list of 10 essentials, guidance on what to wear, and tips for planning your trip with safety and sustainability in mind.

Food & Water Storage

Proper nutrition and hydration are key to a safe and successful hike, but winter’s cold can bring challenges. In extremely cold temperatures food and water can freeze in your pack. This makes it hard or even impossible to consume what you need to stay hydrated and energized. To avoid food and water freezing, try the following:

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 8, 2021

Skiing conditions are prime; outdoor rec continues to boom

Foxy Brown ski trail

This spring, when New York State was in a lockdown due to the pandemic, it was unclear what that meant for the Adirondacks. Would the outdoor tourism industry thrive or falter? Would people still be hitting the trails? Would small businesses survive?

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 6, 2021

Make it: Puréed Parsnip Soup

Puréed Parsnip Soup



My grandmother loved parsnips, and would use them in her cooking like most people would use carrots. You could find them in her red flannel hash, in soups and stews, and even mashed, in heaping bowls, alongside the mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving. Although I did not appreciate parsnips when I was a child, I have grown to love them almost as much as my grandmother did. This simple recipe, which beautifully blends the earthy flavor of parsnips with the sweet acidity of tomatoes and the sharp bite of peppercorns, reminds me of her.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 4, 2021

Newcomb hosts winter photo contest

The Town of Newcomb has announced the start of a winter photo contest. Looking for your best Newcomb winter photos of: landscapes, wildlife, landmarks, and activities (limit of three entries in jpeg format). 

Deadline: March 1st, 2021, by 5:00 p.m.

Include the following information: Name, address, phone, email, location where photo was taken, and title. Photos can be submitted by email to: [email protected] and not to exceed 10MB. 

Photos will become property of Town of Newcomb and may be used for publicity purposes including social media, calendars, etc. More about Newcomb at newcombny.com.

Photo provided by Town of Newcomb

 


Friday, January 29, 2021

Outdoor Conditions (1/29): Plan ahead in winter weather

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

High Peaks Wilderness:

  • Weekend Weather Warning: High winds and extreme low temperatures are forecast for summits in the High Peaks this weekend. Friday morning winds are anticipated to reach gusts of 48 mph and temperatures with wind chill dropping to -52 Fahrenheit. Exposure to these elements is dangerous and travel at elevation or above tree line is not recommended. Extreme cold temperatures will continue through the weekend. Check the National Weather Service Northern Adirondacks and Southern Adirondacks Mountain Point Forecasts for selected summits.
  • Unstable Snowpack: There have been several reports of unstable snowpack on open slopes. Practice safe travel when crossing exposed areas.
  • Colden Caretaker Report 01/27/21: 2.5 feet of snow has accumulated at the Colden Caretaker cabin. Over 3 feet of snow has accumulated on summits. Snowshoes are needed on all trails, starting at parking lots. Skiing is in, including the ski trail, South Meadows Road and the trail to the Flowed Lands. Both Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden are frozen.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 23, 2021

MAKE IT: Anadama Molasses Bread

Anadama Bread

This old-fashioned recipe is an easy way to make a delicious loaf of yeast bread. I usually use whole-wheat flour and blackstrap molasses, but you can use whatever wheat flour and molasses you have on hand (if you successfully substitute other types of flour for the wheat, please let me know!). It does not require a lot of kneading, and will make your kitchen smell amazing when it bakes.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, January 15, 2021

Surviving The Freeze: Animals in Winter

Winter in the mountains is marked by abundant snowfall.  As mountain residents we are hard wired for winter preparation.  When the trees have shed most of their leaves and become an array of barren branches, we like the squirrels are diligently preparing for a long, cold winter.  Barbeque grills and lawn furniture get tucked away, wood piles are stacked wide and tall, fuel tanks filled, snow blowers fueled up and snow shovels are conveniently propped near the entrance of homes.

We are prepared and equipped for nature’s cold, white glitter we call snow.  With the average daily winter temperature being approximately sixteen degrees, double stuffed jackets, insulated boots and hat & mittens become the general attire.  We have our own form of hibernation as we load our cupboards with yummy snacks and settle in for a Netflix marathon.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program launches Winter Learning Series

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program APIPP will be hosting 5 new education events over the course of January through April 2021. The events will be based around the threat of invasive species, habitat integrity, and the economies of the communities which make up the Adirondacks. The APIPP needs your help to combat invasive species on land and in water throughout the Adirondacks, and they are offering the opportunity to sharpen your skills and join the effort.

The discovery of two emerging forest pests within the Adirondacks, the Hemlock Wooly Adelgid and the Emerald Ash Borer incited a race to understand and treat the scale of existing infestations across hundreds of acres. the APIPP’s Winter Learning Series reflects the rising threat of conservation, and challenges homeowners, recreationalists, local businesses, and all interested in citizen science to help prevent the spread of, and to help manage invasive species threatening the North Country.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, January 4, 2021

Thoughts on snow

So far, the best I can say for this winter in the Adirondacks is that I haven’t had to shovel much.

Actually, that’s not all. I took my son downhill skiing this week, and we had a blast for several hours … until the rain soaked through our coats.

Here’s hoping for (and expecting) a 2021 that delivers the snow for all your outdoor adventures, and for our magazine’s suggested ski outings. Regardless of how much snow we get or when we get it, here are some seasonal safety tips we published last winter.

In the meantime, let us know if you have any insights on Adirondack snow to share with us. We’re working on a story about the history and future of snow in these mountains, and what it means to our economy and ecology. Besides what climate scientists and other experts have to say about changes in our winters, we’re interested in hearing personal stories about your experiences and observations through the years.


Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Paul Smith’s readies 5K trail network for Nordic, Biathlon competitions

Paul Smith’s College, working in conjunction with USA Nordic and US Biathlon, is in the position to have its new five-kilometer Nordic Trail network approved by the International Ski Federation FIS and the International Biathlon Union IBU for elite level racing.

Once the project is completed, Paul Smith’s will be the sole collegiate facility in the US with sanctioned trails for Nordic Skiing and a biathlon range on campus. This will set Paul Smith’s College on route towards its goal of becoming the top Nordic and biathlon school in the country.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Hudson River’s Mysterious Frazil Ice

In the old days, 30 years ago, frazil ice started floating down the Hudson River by late November, collecting and backing up from Warrensburg to The Glen by late December.

This year, 2020, it was February before it was cold enough for the “hanging dams” to do their thing. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Life At 39 Degrees

ice fishing adelaide tyrolOn a picture-perfect winter morning last year, 20 Saint Michael’s College students and I visited Vermont Fish and Wildlife scientists for ice fishing at Knight’s Point on Lake Champlain. We drilled holes, baited hooks, learned about ice safety, identified fish – and even caught a few. » Continue Reading.