Posts Tagged ‘Women’s Suffrage’

Friday, May 24, 2019

‘Women Will Vote’ Exhibit Opening in Ticonderoga

womens right to voteThe Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to unveil a traveling exhibit addressing Women’s Suffrage and present a free public program entitled “Women Will Vote” on Friday, May 31 at 7 pm at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle, Ticonderoga.

The program will look at often-overlooked consequences of Women’s Suffrage, including internal disagreements that threatened to sideline the movement, the institution of Prohibition, and changes in women’s roles within the workforce. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 24, 2018

Women’s Equality Day Commemoration In Plattsburgh

A Women’s Equality Day Commemoration has been set for Sunday, August 26, from noon to 4 pm at the Clinton County Historical Association, located at 98 Ohio Avenue, in Plattsburgh.

August 26 was set-aside in 1971 as an annual event to celebrate the August 26, 1920, adoption of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. The Commemoration’s goal is to raise awareness about the importance of gender equality and to commemorate the work and sacrifices made by women during the suffrage movement. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 12, 2018

‘Imprisoned for the Cause’ Opening at Ti Historical

Suffragettes Picketing White HouseThe Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to open its 2018 season with a free program and exhibit opening on Friday, April 20 at 7 pm at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle.

“Imprisoned for the Cause” will look at the arrest, imprisonment and inhumane treatment of women peacefully protesting for women’s suffrage in 1917. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 7, 2017

5 Myths About New York’s Suffrage Centennial

Photo by John Warren.As of November 6, 1917, the State of New York became the first state east of the Mississippi to grant full voting rights to women. The tremendous support from New York City overcame the lack of support from most upstate counties. Essex County was one exception, approving woman suffrage by a margin of 15 votes: 2838 to 2823. “Newcomb is the Banner Suffrage Town” announced the Adirondack Record. The town “did her bit” for the ladies, casting 73 votes for suffrage and only 6 against. “Newcomb is certainly most chivalrous.”

Minerva, North Elba, St. Armand, Ticonderoga and Westport also approved the suffrage measure, but regardless of whether your town voted for or against suffrage, it is time to celebrate. The centennial of NY women winning the vote is being commemorated in Albany, Seneca Falls, Johnstown, Ticonderoga, Plattsburgh and other towns across the state. From flotillas to parades, rallies, conferences, and tea parties, the events celebrating the suffrage centennial have been informative and energizing. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 16, 2017

1900 Suffrage Convention Reenactment Set For Glens Falls

YMCA building in glens fallsThe Glens Falls Area Suffrage Centennial Committee has announced they will hold a 1900 Suffrage Convention reenactment to commemorate the New York State Woman Suffrage Centennial in Glens Falls on Saturday, October 21 from 1 to 3 pm at the First Baptist Church at 100 Maple Street.

The event will reenact the annual New York State Woman Suffrage Association Convention held at Rockwell House, and Ordway Hall in Glens Falls in the autumn of 1900. Speeches will be presented by historians and reenactors in period attire. National figures to be portrayed at the Convention include Carrie Chapman Catt, Rev. Anna Howard Shaw, and Mary S. Anthony, sister of Susan. Local figures will be portrayed as well, including Addison B. Colvin, Mary Loines, and Susan Bain. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 4, 2017

TR Weekend Highlights Women’s Suffrage, WW1

newcomb logoThe town of Newcomb will celebrate Theodore Roosevelt’s journey out of the High Peaks wilderness, from Newcomb to the White House, following President William McKinley’s assassination to become the 26th president with “TR Weekend” September 15 to 17th.

This year’s event also commemorates the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote and the 100th anniversary of the United States entering into World War One.

Events are planned over the entire weekend throughout Newcomb with cultural and informative entertainment for all ages.  » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Adirondack History Museum Celebrating Suffrage Centennial

Ava Roberts of Peru visits the Adirondack History Museum’s new exhibit Adirondack SuffragistsUntil 100 years ago, women did not have the right to vote in New York State. That changed on November 6, 1917, when New Yorkers voted to give women the ballot. The Adirondack History Museum is marking the occasion with “Adirondack Suffragists: 100 Years of Votes for Women,” a multimedia exhibit highlighting the national, state and regional aspects of the movement.

Though preceded by many western states in state-level action, New York was nonetheless a major national battleground in the fight for women’s rights in general and in the struggle for the passage of a national woman’s suffrage amendment – one finally ratified in 1920 as the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Suffrage Rally Reenactment to Commemorate Suffrage Centennial

gazebo in city parkThe Glens Falls Area Suffrage Centennial Committee will present a Suffrage Rally reenactment to commemorate the New York State Woman Suffrage Centennial to be performed in Glens Falls on Sunday, May 7 from 1 to 3 pm at the gazebo in City Park. This event is free and open to the public.

The Suffrage Rally will reenact the history of the campaign for women’s voting rights through historical speeches, letters and songs. Featured will be national figures such as Susan B. Anthony, Inez Milholland, and Carrie Chapman Catt, all of which had local ties. Visitors will also hear from lesser known suffragists, like Warren County leader of the New York State Woman Suffrage Party, Emily Nordstrom. Reenactors presenting the anti-suffragist view will also be on hand. Dr. Charles Dana, neurologist, and Lucy Price, a Vassar girl who spoke here while making a tour of the northeast in 1915, are on the roster. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 27, 2017

Sandra Weber: Lessons from Suffrage Movement

For decades, history books have fed us the simplistic notion that women struggled for the vote while men opposed them. Hogwash! Some women opposed suffrage and some men supported it. The issue was a battle about the sexes; the battle itself was fought by women and men against other women and men.

The North Country region resembled most of upstate New York in the 1800s, rural and a hotbed for reform movements: abolition, prohibition, forest preservation, women’s rights. Of course, there was also opposition to some of these changes. The major reason for resistance to women’s rights had to do with long-held conventional notions about the roles of men and women, the roles of blacks and whites, and the interpretation of the Bible. In general, these views supported a white patriarchy and contested any threat to the perpetuation of its authority. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

‘Bluestockings’ Once Battled for Women’s Rights

Women’s history month (March) is a reminder of the struggles they have endured for equality and fair treatment. Unity is important in any movement, but in the North Country, women were often on opposing sides in the battle for equal rights. The region’s rural nature had much to do with that division, as did the population’s roots: mountain folk, farmers, and miners were primarily immigrants (many via Quebec) from European countries that were overwhelmingly Catholic or Protestant.

Resistance to change was organized by branding the opposition as silly and simultaneously ungodly. For more than a century in the United States, those promoting women’s rights were labeled Bluestockings, a term that has been used both in a complimentary and a pejorative sense.

Its origins are nebulous, but it’s known that in the 1700s, Bluestockings in England were educated women unwilling to settle for being simply an adornment on a man’s arm. They learned languages, engaged in political discussions, and sought to better themselves by gaining certain rights previously enjoyed only by the privileged in society: men.

» Continue Reading.